impressionism


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Related to impressionism: Post impressionism

im·pres·sion·ism

 (ĭm-prĕsh′ə-nĭz′əm)
n.
1. often Impressionism A theory or style of painting originating and developed in France during the 1870s, characterized by concentration on the immediate visual impression produced by a scene and by the use of unmixed primary colors and small strokes to simulate actual reflected light.
2. A literary style characterized by the use of details and mental associations to evoke subjective and sensory impressions rather than the re-creation of objective reality.
3. Music A style of art music of the late 1800s and early 1900s, often evoking a dreamy mood and characterized by modal or whole-tone scales, rich and often dissonant harmonies in unconventional progressions, and the avoidance of traditional forms.

impressionism

(ɪmˈprɛʃəˌnɪzəm)
n
1. (Art Movements) (often capital) a movement in French painting, developed in the 1870s chiefly by Monet, Renoir, Pissarro, and Sisley, having the aim of objectively recording experience by a system of fleeting impressions, esp of natural light effects
2. (Art Terms) the technique in art, literature, or music of conveying experience by capturing fleeting impressions of reality or of mood

im•pres•sion•ism

(ɪmˈprɛʃ əˌnɪz əm)

n.
1. (usu. cap.) a style of late 19th-century painting characterized chiefly by short brush strokes of bright colors in immediate juxtaposition to represent the effect of light on objects.
2. a style of literature that emphasizes mood and sensory impressions.
3. a late 19th-century and early 20th-century style of musical composition in which subtle harmony, rhythm, and tonal color are used to evoke moods and impressions.
[1880–85]

Impressionism

a movement in the late 19th century in French painting, characterized by the goal of reproducing an impression of a subject by use of reflected light and color and the blurring of outlines. — Impressionist, n., adj.Impressionistic, adj.
See also: Art

impressionism

1. A musical technique or movement that shared the aim of impressionism in painting, that is, to capture and convey an impression of changing reality or fleeting mood. The main exponent of this style was the French composer, Claude Debussy (1862–1918).
2. (1874–1886) Centering on a diverse group of eight artists, including Cézanne, Renoir, Manet, and Monet, who held eight exhibitions between 1874 and 1886, the movement derives its name from a painting by Monet, Impression: Sunrise. Impressionists were concerned with light and its effects, and the use of “broken” color.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.impressionism - a school of late 19th century French painters who pictured appearances by strokes of unmixed colors to give the impression of reflected lightImpressionism - a school of late 19th century French painters who pictured appearances by strokes of unmixed colors to give the impression of reflected light
art movement, artistic movement - a group of artists who agree on general principles
Translations
impresszionizmus
impresjonizm

impressionism

[ɪmˈpreʃənɪzəm] N (Art) → impresionismo m

Impressionism

impressionism [ɪmˈprɛʃənɪzəm] nimpressionnisme m

impressionism

impressionism

[ɪmˈprɛʃəˌnɪzm] n (Art) → impressionismo
References in classic literature ?
The chief characteristics of his poetry are intense concentration, a vivid power of impressionism, and a strong leaning in the direction of the occult.
At that time impressionism reigned in the Latin Quarter, but its victory over the older schools was still recent; and Carolus-Duran, Bouguereau, and their like were set up against Manet, Monet, and Degas.
All this morbid impressionism must be Kidd's excuse for having cried out, brutally and beyond all reason: "Did you do this, you devil?"
This is an excellent introduction to Impressionism and the artists who introduced it.
Having engaged subjects as diverse as the impressionism yet realism and freestyle movement, to absorb all the influence that the West and East has to offer, her work reproduces familiar visual signs, arranging them into new conceptually layered pigments in oils and dry pastels outlining.
At some of the stalls devoted to art, architecture, impressionism, fashion, landscaping and allied topics, one can find a whole range of books in various volumes for prices ranging from RO 8-10 to RO800.
In the wonderfully illustrated pages of "Painters of the Northwest: Impressionism to Modernism, 1900-1930", art historian John Impert introduces readers to the rich and varied array of artists and works of art that defined the region's artistic transition from a nature-bound impressionism to the arrival of modernism.
Lasting Impressions: The Legacies of Impressionism in Contemporary Culture, by Jesse Matz.
This work spotlights literary impressionism, a literary movement of the late 19th and early 20th century that emphasized description to paint a picture in readersAE minds.
'Colours of Impressionism: Masterpieces from the Musee d' Orsay,' said Paul Perrin, cocurator with Marine Kisiel, 'gives the nod to the Impressionists' radical use of color,' and the paintings 'are presented in thematic sections based on colors' used by the foremost practitioners of the revolutionary style.
Impressionism is a painting style used by artists like Edgar Degas, Claude Monet, and Paul CA[c]zanne.