imprimatur


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im·pri·ma·tur

 (ĭm′prə-mä′to͝or, -mā′tər)
n.
1. Official approval or license to print or publish, especially as granted by a censor or an ecclesiastical authority.
2.
a. Official approval; sanction: Does their idea get your imprimatur?
b. A mark of official approval: a directive bearing the imprimatur of high officials.

[From New Latin imprimātur, let it be printed, third person sing. present subjunctive passive of Latin imprimere, to imprint; see impress1.]

imprimatur

(ˌɪmprɪˈmeɪtə; -ˈmɑː-)
n
1. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church a licence granted by a bishop certifying the Church's approval of a book to be published
2. sanction, authority, or approval, esp for something to be printed
[C17: New Latin, literally: let it be printed]

im•pri•ma•tur

(ˌɪm prɪˈmɑ tər, -ˈmeɪ-, ɪmˈprɪm əˌtʊər, -ˌtyʊər)

n.
1. permission to print or publish a book, pamphlet, etc., granted by a bishop's authority after such work has received a censor's clearance. Compare nihil obstat.
2. sanction; approval.
[1630–40; < New Latin: let it be printed, Latin: let it be made by pressing upon (something)]

imprimatur

permission, particularly that given by the Roman Catholic Church, to publish or print; hence, any sanction or approval. (Latin: ‘let it be printed.’)
See also: Catholicism
permission, particularly that given by the Roman Catholic Church, to publish or print; hence, any sanction or approval.
See also: Printing
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.imprimatur - formal and explicit approval; "a Democrat usually gets the union's endorsement"
commendation, approval - a message expressing a favorable opinion; "words of approval seldom passed his lips"
O.K., okay, okeh, okey, OK - an endorsement; "they gave us the O.K. to go ahead"
visa - an endorsement made in a passport that allows the bearer to enter the country issuing it
nihil obstat - the phrase used by the official censor of the Roman Catholic Church to say that a publication has been examined and contains nothing offensive to the church
Translations
imprimaturjulkaisulupa
imprimatúra

imprimatur

[ɪmprɪˈmeɪtəʳ] N (Publishing) (also fig) → imprimátur m

imprimatur

n (form)Imprimatur nt
References in periodicals archive ?
The imprimatur itself was pretty neat," Leinan said.
Such budget allocations are not subject to the imprimatur of anybody else.
McEneaney, who saw his charges earn a fortunate draw with Mick O'Dwyer's Wicklow in the opening game, was happy to give it his imprimatur.
With the government's imprimatur and a condom wrapper inspired by New York's subways, city workers and volunteers in New York City handed out more than 150,000 condoms at numerous subway stations across the city on 14 February, Valentine's Day.
For a fee charged by the CIC to those seeking the credibility of the CIC imprimatur, CIC members with the expertise could be engaged by the CIC to do the reviews.
Is Canada out of step with Rome, brought to mind words Jesus spoke to Catalina Rivas in 1996, The Great Crusade of Love, which bears the imprimatur of Rene Fernandez Apaza, Archbishop of Cochabamba:
Schneider, released the report, he said the agency should no longer put its official imprimatur on research comparing charter with public schools and leave such studies to independent researchers.
Even once the regulations are finalized, producers will be able to label their beef grass-fed, but the new regulations will cover labels with USDA's imprimatur.
Why, with the imprimatur of the Scripps Center and at almost $1 each, the cholesterol-lowering cookie will practically sell itself.
He describes Iraq's response to calls to account for its alleged stockpiles of illegal weapons and failed US and British efforts to gain imprimatur for their military actions in a manner that largely conforms to official views and eschews much critical analysis.
Michael Jackson, the noted British beer writer, has put his imprimatur on a new beer club designed to provide members with samples of some of the rarest beers in the world.
As such, it is perhaps worth considering Monahan's oeuvre in the light of Daniel Buren's influential 1971 essay "The Function of the Studio," which proposes that any object produced in an artist's workspace and then displayed in a museum has engaged in an "unspeakable compromise," trading its own history and specificity for a kind of generic, free-floating institutional imprimatur.