imprimatur


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im·pri·ma·tur

 (ĭm′prə-mä′to͝or, -mā′tər)
n.
1. Official approval or license to print or publish, especially as granted by a censor or an ecclesiastical authority.
2.
a. Official approval; sanction: Does their idea get your imprimatur?
b. A mark of official approval: a directive bearing the imprimatur of high officials.

[From New Latin imprimātur, let it be printed, third person sing. present subjunctive passive of Latin imprimere, to imprint; see impress1.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

imprimatur

(ˌɪmprɪˈmeɪtə; -ˈmɑː-)
n
1. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church a licence granted by a bishop certifying the Church's approval of a book to be published
2. sanction, authority, or approval, esp for something to be printed
[C17: New Latin, literally: let it be printed]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

im•pri•ma•tur

(ˌɪm prɪˈmɑ tər, -ˈmeɪ-, ɪmˈprɪm əˌtʊər, -ˌtyʊər)

n.
1. permission to print or publish a book, pamphlet, etc., granted by a bishop's authority after such work has received a censor's clearance. Compare nihil obstat.
2. sanction; approval.
[1630–40; < New Latin: let it be printed, Latin: let it be made by pressing upon (something)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

imprimatur

permission, particularly that given by the Roman Catholic Church, to publish or print; hence, any sanction or approval. (Latin: ‘let it be printed.’)
See also: Catholicism
permission, particularly that given by the Roman Catholic Church, to publish or print; hence, any sanction or approval.
See also: Printing
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.imprimatur - formal and explicit approval; "a Democrat usually gets the union's endorsement"
commendation, approval - a message expressing a favorable opinion; "words of approval seldom passed his lips"
O.K., okay, okeh, okey, OK - an endorsement; "they gave us the O.K. to go ahead"
visa - an endorsement made in a passport that allows the bearer to enter the country issuing it
nihil obstat - the phrase used by the official censor of the Roman Catholic Church to say that a publication has been examined and contains nothing offensive to the church
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
imprimaturjulkaisulupa
imprimatúra

imprimatur

[ɪmprɪˈmeɪtəʳ] N (Publishing) (also fig) → imprimátur m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

imprimatur

n (form)Imprimatur nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
So I would like to say that whatever added recommendations that Joey Salceda gave I also put my own imprimatur on them," Arroyo said in a media interview during the inauguration of the Pasac-Culcul 1 and 2 Bridges and Samal Bridge in Minalin, Pampanga.
Wuerl implied that had Johnson sought an imprimatur before publishing Quest for the Living God, his committee would not have been required to investigate the book.
The remaining publications have engaged in considerable self-censorship so that little real news appears in print absent an official imprimatur,
The couple's last novel, Imprimatur, was equally revelatory, and is still banned in Italy, where Monaldi and Sorti live with their children.
Boissonneau, Auxiliary Bishop of Toronto, and an Imprimatur by Thomas Collins, Archbishop of Toronto (15 April 2009).
Under the imprimatur of Byron Bay and the Locals book series the first title sees the creatures enjoying skateboarding.
"Today I Was Baptized" carries the imprimatur and rescript of the Catholic Church.
Those standards have always carried the imprimatur of the Bar, she said.
Marvin Traub the retailer, consultant, fashion imprimatur and worldwide businessman is back as Marvin Traub the author.
After more than a decade, Gonzalez has put her imprimatur on nearly every aspect of the 42-year-old firm and has been instrumental in its steady growth.
The view that other human beings - each made in the image of God and carriers of His imprimatur - are nothing more than disposable commodities has no place in 21st Century Britain.
Just in time for summer fun, the American Academy of Dermatology has started a program to give it official imprimatur to sunscreen products.