improbity


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im·pro·bi·ty

 (ĭm-prō′bĭ-tē)
n.
Lack of probity; dishonesty.

[Middle English improbite, shameless persistence, from Old French, dishonesty, from Latin improbitās, from improbus, dishonest : in-, not; see in-1 + probus, honest, good; see per in Indo-European roots.]

improbity

(ɪmˈprəʊbɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
dishonesty, wickedness, or unscrupulousness
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improbity

noun
1. Departure from what is legally, ethically, and morally correct:
Informal: crookedness.
2. Lack of integrity:
References in periodicals archive ?
Following the Fifth Chamber approval, the MPF and the Company will jointly request the Federal Court to formally close the Improbity Lawsuit filed by the MPF in 2017, including the associated provisional measure to secure payment of potential damages.
Chicago: Fitch Ratings has placed the 'BB-' ratings for SBM Baleia Azul, S.a.r.l.'s senior secured notes on Rating Watch Negative due to the uncertainty regarding a judge's July 4, 2018 interim decision relating to the Brazilian Improbity Act.
Although, the results of the study by Weber (2007) indicated that there was no significant positive correlation between the actions of the municipal councils of Education and Health and the acts of administrative improbity. This divergence of results in the studies with Brazilian data motivated the development of this research.
Improbity or moral decay occurs when a decision-maker consents to or demands deviation from the appropriate decision-making criteria.
It is the keenest spur to exertion and the surest of all guards against improbity. It keeps the judge himself while trying under trial.
In actions concerning administrative improbity, the MPF is the only institution that can officially conduct a civil investigation (called inquerito civil).
In proportion as it is desirable for improbity to shroud
as a source of concern 'almost equal' to quid pro quo improbity." (citations omitted)); McConnell v.
the surest of all guards against improbity. It keeps the judge himself, while trying [the case], under trial." JEREMY BENTHAM, BENTHAMIANA; OR, SELECT EXTRACTS FROM THE WORKS OF JEREMY BENTHAM 115 (John Hill Burton ed., Edinburgh, William Tait 1843), quoted in NEIL ANDREWS, PRINCIPLES OF CIVIL PROCEDURE 24 (1994).
Following the 1996 election--which was marked by fundraising improbity on both sides--House and Senate Republicans mounted separate investigations of White House fundraising.