improvident


Also found in: Thesaurus.
Related to improvident: brusqueness

im·prov·i·dent

 (ĭm-prŏv′ĭ-dənt)
adj.
1. Not providing for the future; thriftless.
2. Rash; incautious.

im·prov′i·dence n.
im·prov′i·dent·ly adv.

improvident

(ɪmˈprɒvɪdənt)
adj
1. not provident; thriftless, imprudent, or prodigal
2. heedless or incautious; rash
imˈprovidence n
imˈprovidently adv

im•prov•i•dent

(ɪmˈprɒv ɪ dənt)

adj.
not provident; neglecting to provide for future needs: The improvident worker saved no money.
[1505–15]
im•prov′i•dence, n.
im•prov′i•dent•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.improvident - not provident; not providing for the future
imprudent - not prudent or wise; "very imprudent of her mother to encourage her in such silly romantic ideas"; "would be imprudent for a noneconomist to talk about the details of economic policy"- A.M.Schlesinger
wasteful - tending to squander and waste
provident - providing carefully for the future; "wild squirrels are provident"; "a provident father plans for his children's education"
2.improvident - not given careful consideration; "ill-considered actions often result in disaster"; "an ill-judged attempt"
imprudent - not prudent or wise; "very imprudent of her mother to encourage her in such silly romantic ideas"; "would be imprudent for a noneconomist to talk about the details of economic policy"- A.M.Schlesinger

improvident

adjective
1. Reckless, especially in the use of material resources:
Translations

improvident

[ɪmˈprɒvɪdənt] ADJ [person] → imprevisor; [action] → carente de previsión

improvident

adjsorglos

improvident

[ɪmˈprɒvɪdnt] (frm) adj (not providing for future) → imprevidente; (thriftless) → prodigo/a; (heedless) → imprudente
References in classic literature ?
They had a large family, and they were very improvident and cheerful.
"As you have been always the best and kindest of uncles to me, and as you have shown such unparalleled goodness in forgiving this match, which to be sure may be thought a little improvident, I should never forgive myself if I attempted to deceive you in anything." He then confessed the truth, and opened the whole affair.
Then you see, some people as was better off said, and a good many such people lived pretty close up to the mark themselves if not beyond it so he'd heerd, that they was 'improvident' (that was the favourite word) down the Yard.
Some of them retained a little of the thrift and forethought of the civilized man, and became wealthy among their improvident neighbors; their wealth being chiefly displayed in large bands of horses, which covered the prairies in the vicinity of their abodes.
'As to an individual, ma'am,' said Bitzer, dropping his voice and drawing nearer, 'he is as improvident as any of the people in this town.
And how came he not to have settled that matter before this person's death?--NOW indeed it would be too late to sell it, but a man of Colonel Brandon's sense!--I wonder he should be so improvident in a point of such common, such natural, concern!--Well, I am convinced that there is a vast deal of inconsistency in almost every human character.
She found, to her dismay, that this was owing to their having eaten all the seed potatoes, that last lapse of the improvident. At the earliest moment she obtained what others she could procure, and in a few days her father was well enough to see to the garden, under Tess's persuasive efforts: while she herself undertook the allotment-plot which they rented in a field a couple of hundred yards out of the village.
He had been a classmate of Bowen Tyler at college, and a fraternity brother, and before, that he had been an impoverished and improvident cow-puncher on one of the great Tyler ranches.
I do not deny that he is improvident. I do not deny that he has kept me in the dark as to his resources and his liabilities both,' she went on, looking at the wall; 'but I never will desert Mr.
But I'm improvident: I live in the moment when I'm happy."
[Footnote: The life of Dickens by his friend John Forster is another of the most famous English biographies.] The most popular of all English novelists, Charles Dickens, was born in 1812, the son of an unpractical and improvident government navy clerk whom, with questionable taste, he later caricatured in 'David Copperfield' as Mr.
Although in later times it has been a very different place from the sink of filth and dirt it once was, even its improved condition holds out but little temptation to the extravagant, or consolation to the improvident. The condemned felon has as good a yard for air and exercise in Newgate, as the insolvent debtor in the Marshalsea Prison.

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