impudent

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im·pu·dent

 (ĭm′pyə-dənt)
adj.
1. Offensively bold or disrespectful; insolent or impertinent. See Synonyms at shameless.
2. Obsolete Immodest.

[Middle English, from Latin impudēns, impudent- : in-, not; see in-1 + pudēns, present participle of pudēre, to be ashamed.]

im′pu·dent·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

impudent

(ˈɪmpjʊdənt)
adj
1. mischievous, impertinent, or disrespectful
2. an obsolete word for immodest
ˈimpudently adv
ˈimpudentness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

im•pu•dent

(ˈɪm pyə dənt)

adj.
1. of, pertaining to, or characterized by impertinence.
2. Obs. shameless; immodest.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin impudēns shameless =im- im-2 + pudēns, present participle of pudēre to feel shame]
im′pu•dent•ly, adv.
syn: See impertinent.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.impudent - marked by casual disrespect; "a flip answer to serious question"; "the student was kept in for impudent behavior"
disrespectful - exhibiting lack of respect; rude and discourteous; "remarks disrespectful of the law"; "disrespectful in the presence of his parents"; "disrespectful toward his teacher"
2.impudent - improperly forward or bold; "don't be fresh with me"; "impertinent of a child to lecture a grownup"; "an impudent boy given to insulting strangers"; "Don't get wise with me!"
forward - used of temperament or behavior; lacking restraint or modesty; "a forward child badly in need of discipline"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

impudent

adjective bold, rude, cheeky (informal), forward, fresh (informal), saucy (informal), cocky (informal), audacious, brazen, shameless, sassy (U.S. informal), pert, presumptuous, impertinent, insolent, lippy (U.S. & Canad. slang), bumptious, immodest, bold-faced Some were well behaved, while others were impudent.
retiring, modest, polite, timid, respectful, courteous, well-behaved, self-effacing
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

impudent

adjective
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
وقِح، صَفيق، بَذيء
nestydatý
frækuforskammet
ósvífinn
bezkaunīgsnekaunīgs
nesramenpredrzen

impudent

[ˈɪmpjʊdənt] ADJ [person] → insolente, descarado; [behaviour] → insolente
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

impudent

[ˈɪmpjʊdənt] adjimpudent(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

impudent

adj, impudently
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

impudent

[ˈɪmpjʊdnt] adjimpertinente, impudente
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

impudent

(ˈimpjudənt) adjective
rude; disrespectful. an impudent child/suggestion.
ˈimpudently adverb
ˈimpudence noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
"Impudence! Impudence!" they heard behind them the voice of Mavra Kuzminichna who had entered silently.
"You have the impudence? A man who will accept bribes will probably offer them.
But the Cricket, who was a wise old philosopher, instead of being offended at Pinocchio's impudence, continued in the same tone:
'It would be like his impudence,' interposed Mrs Varden, bridling,
Here was the very thing he wanted, here was good cause reason and foundation for pretending to be angry; but having this cause reason and foundation which he had come expressly to seek, not expecting to find, Richard Swiveller was angry in sound earnest, and wondered what the devil Cheggs meant by his impudence.
With her usual impudence, my companion then made some attempts to get up a conversation; but the monosyllables 'yes,' or