impulsion

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im·pul·sion

 (ĭm-pŭl′shən)
n.
1. The act of impelling or the condition of being impelled: "I do not move ... unless it be under the impulsion of a third party" (Samuel Beckett).
2. An impelling force; a thrust.
3. Motion produced by an impelling force; momentum.
4. A wish or urge from within; an impulse.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

impulsion

(ɪmˈpʌlʃən)
n
1. the act of impelling or the state of being impelled
2. motion produced by an impulse; propulsion
3. a driving force; compulsion
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

im•pul•sion

(ɪmˈpʌl ʃən)

n.
1. the act of impelling.
2. the resulting state or effect.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.impulsion - a force that moves something alongimpulsion - a force that moves something along  
force - (physics) the influence that produces a change in a physical quantity; "force equals mass times acceleration"
2.impulsion - the act of applying force suddenly; "the impulse knocked him over"
drive, driving force, thrust - the act of applying force to propel something; "after reaching the desired velocity the drive is cut off"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

impulsion

[ɪmˈpʌlʃən] Nimpulsión f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

impulsion

n (lit: = act of impelling) → Antrieb m; (lit, fig: = driving force also) → Antriebskraft f; (fig) (= impetus)Impuls m; (= compulsion)Trieb m, → Drang m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

impulsion

[ɪmˈpʌlʃn] nimpulso
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Later on, when each developed individuality and became personally conscious of impulsions and desires, the attraction of the light increased.
It is acted upon by three independent forces: the resistance of the air, the attraction of the earth, and the force of impulsion with which it is endowed.
At length I was clear of my dangerous neighbour, and just as I gave the last impulsion, my hands came across a light cord that was trailing overboard across the stern bulwarks.
He had discovered, besides, since his departure from Chateaubriand, that nothing would be impossible for Furet under the impulsion of M.