imputation


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im·pu·ta·tion

 (ĭm′pyo͝o-tā′shən)
n.
1. The act of imputing or ascribing; attribution.
2. Something imputed, ascribed, or attributed.

im·pu′ta·tive (ĭm-pyo͞o′tə-tĭv) adj.
im·pu′ta·tive·ly adv.

im•pu•ta•tion

(ˌɪm pyʊˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act of imputing.
2. an attribution, as of fault or crime; accusation.
[1535–45; < Late Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.imputation - a statement attributing something dishonest (especially a criminal offense); "he denied the imputation"
accusal, accusation - a formal charge of wrongdoing brought against a person; the act of imputing blame or guilt
fingerpointing, finger-pointing - the imputation of blame; "they want all the finger-pointing about intelligence failures to stop"
2.imputation - the attribution to a source or cause; "the imputation that my success was due to nepotism meant that I was not taken seriously"
ascription, attribution - assigning to a cause or source; "the attribution of lighting to an expression of God's wrath"; "he questioned the attribution of the painting to Picasso"

imputation

noun blame, charge, accusation, censure, slur, reproach, slander, attribution, insinuation, ascription, aspersion They avoided the imputation of criminal negligence.

imputation

noun
1. A charging of someone with a misdeed:
2. The act of attributing:
Translations

imputation

[ˌɪmpjʊˈteɪʃən] N (= attribution) → imputación f; (= accusation) → imputación f, acusación f

imputation

n (of crime)Bezichtigung f; (of lie also)Unterstellung f

imputation

[ˌɪmpjʊˈteɪʃn] n (frm) → capo d'imputazione or d'accusa
References in classic literature ?
Altho' I cannot agree with you in supposing that I shall never again be exposed to Misfortunes as unmerited as those I have already experienced, yet to avoid the imputation of Obstinacy or ill-nature, I will gratify the curiosity of your daughter; and may the fortitude with which I have suffered the many afflictions of my past Life, prove to her a useful lesson for the support of those which may befall her in her own.
From even the barely hinted imputation of usurpation, and the possible consequences of such a suppressed impression gaining ground, Ahab must of course have been most anxious to protect himself.
And of all princes, it is impossible for the new prince to avoid the imputation of cruelty, owing to new states being full of dangers.
I take the imputation in good part, as a compliment to the just delineation of my female characters; and though I am bound to attribute much of the severity of my censors to this suspicion, I make no effort to refute it, because, in my own mind, I am satisfied that if a book is a good one, it is so whatever the sex of the author may be.
To avoid, therefore, all imputation of laying down a rule for posterity, founded only on the authority of
Miss Temple, having assembled the whole school, announced that inquiry had been made into the charges alleged against Jane Eyre, and that she was most happy to be able to pronounce her completely cleared from every imputation.
Still further to screen her husband from any imputation on unkindness to her, she took twenty-five of the fifty pounds Clare had given her, and handed the sum over to her mother, as if the wife of a man like Angel Clare could well afford it, saying that it was a slight return for the trouble and humiliation she had brought upon them in years past.
Then, when our ammunition was gone and the Klondiker, still somewhat sober, began to babble again of Milly, Kraft whispered into his ear such a polite, barbed insult relating to people who were miserly with their funds, that the miner crashed down handful after handful of silver and notes, calling for all the fluids in the world to drown the imputation.
She resents, for all the world like some high little personage, the imputation on her truthfulness and, as it were, her respectability.
Try as hard as they might, the servants could never succeed in persuading him that he was drunk; he always scorned the imputation.
But I could have easily vindicated humankind from the imputation of singularity upon the last article, if there had been any swine in that country (as unluckily for me there were not), which, although it may be a sweeter quadruped than a YAHOO, cannot, I humbly conceive, in justice, pretend to more cleanliness; and so his honour himself must have owned, if he had seen their filthy way of feeding, and their custom of wallowing and sleeping in the mud.
And so, having no other answer ready, I merely held my tongue, but felt as if I were resting under an imputation of guilt, and that my silence was being construed into a confession.