impute

(redirected from imputations)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal.
Related to imputations: Pertaining to

im·pute

 (ĭm-pyo͞ot′)
tr.v. im·put·ed, im·put·ing, im·putes
1. To relate (something, usually something bad) to a particular cause or source; place the fault or responsibility for: imputed the rocket failure to a faulty gasket; kindly imputed my clumsiness to inexperience. See Synonyms at attribute.
2. To assign as a characteristic; credit: the gracefulness so often imputed to cats.

[Middle English imputen, from Old French emputer, from Latin imputāre : in-, in; see in-2 + putāre, to settle an account; see pau- in Indo-European roots.]

impute

(ɪmˈpjuːt)
vb (tr)
1. to attribute or ascribe (something dishonest or dishonourable, esp a criminal offence) to a person
2. to attribute to a source or cause: I impute your success to nepotism.
3. (Commerce) commerce to give (a notional value) to goods or services when the real value is unknown
[C14: from Latin imputāre, from im- + putāre to think, calculate]
ˌimpuˈtation n
imˈputative adj
imˈputatively adv
imˈputer n

im•pute

(ɪmˈpyut)

v.t. -put•ed, -put•ing.
1. to attribute or ascribe: The children imputed magical powers to the old woman.
2. to attribute or ascribe (something discreditable) to someone or something.
3. to attribute (righteousness, guilt, etc.) to a person or persons vicariously.
4. to charge (a person) with fault.
[1325–75; Middle English < Latin imputāre=im- im-1 + putāre to assess, think; see putative]
im•put′a•ble, adj.
im•put′er, n.
syn: See attribute.

impute


Past participle: imputed
Gerund: imputing

Imperative
impute
impute
Present
I impute
you impute
he/she/it imputes
we impute
you impute
they impute
Preterite
I imputed
you imputed
he/she/it imputed
we imputed
you imputed
they imputed
Present Continuous
I am imputing
you are imputing
he/she/it is imputing
we are imputing
you are imputing
they are imputing
Present Perfect
I have imputed
you have imputed
he/she/it has imputed
we have imputed
you have imputed
they have imputed
Past Continuous
I was imputing
you were imputing
he/she/it was imputing
we were imputing
you were imputing
they were imputing
Past Perfect
I had imputed
you had imputed
he/she/it had imputed
we had imputed
you had imputed
they had imputed
Future
I will impute
you will impute
he/she/it will impute
we will impute
you will impute
they will impute
Future Perfect
I will have imputed
you will have imputed
he/she/it will have imputed
we will have imputed
you will have imputed
they will have imputed
Future Continuous
I will be imputing
you will be imputing
he/she/it will be imputing
we will be imputing
you will be imputing
they will be imputing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been imputing
you have been imputing
he/she/it has been imputing
we have been imputing
you have been imputing
they have been imputing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been imputing
you will have been imputing
he/she/it will have been imputing
we will have been imputing
you will have been imputing
they will have been imputing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been imputing
you had been imputing
he/she/it had been imputing
we had been imputing
you had been imputing
they had been imputing
Conditional
I would impute
you would impute
he/she/it would impute
we would impute
you would impute
they would impute
Past Conditional
I would have imputed
you would have imputed
he/she/it would have imputed
we would have imputed
you would have imputed
they would have imputed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.impute - attribute or credit toimpute - attribute or credit to; "We attributed this quotation to Shakespeare"; "People impute great cleverness to cats"
pass judgment, evaluate, judge - form a critical opinion of; "I cannot judge some works of modern art"; "How do you evaluate this grant proposal?" "We shouldn't pass judgment on other people"
impute - attribute (responsibility or fault) to a cause or source; "The teacher imputed the student's failure to his nervousness"
carnalize, sensualize - ascribe to an origin in sensation
credit - give someone credit for something; "We credited her for saving our jobs"
reattribute - attribute to another source
anthropomorphise, anthropomorphize - ascribe human features to something
personate, personify - attribute human qualities to something; "The Greeks personated their gods ridiculous"
credit, accredit - ascribe an achievement to; "She was not properly credited in the program"
blame, charge - attribute responsibility to; "We blamed the accident on her"; "The tragedy was charged to her inexperience"
externalise, externalize, project - regard as objective
interiorise, interiorize, internalise, internalize - incorporate within oneself; make subjective or personal; "internalize a belief"
2.impute - attribute (responsibility or fault) to a cause or source; "The teacher imputed the student's failure to his nervousness"
ascribe, attribute, impute, assign - attribute or credit to; "We attributed this quotation to Shakespeare"; "People impute great cleverness to cats"

impute

verb attribute, assign, ascribe, credit, refer, accredit It is unfair to impute blame to the employees.

impute

verb
1. To ascribe (a misdeed or an error, for example) to:
2. To regard as belonging to or resulting from another:
Translations

impute

[ɪmˈpjuːt] VT to impute sth to sbimputar or atribuir algo a algn

impute

[ɪmˈpjuːt] vt (= attribute) → imputer
to impute blame to sb → imputer la responsabilité à qn

impute

vtzuschreiben (to sb/sth jdm/einer Sache); to impute a crime to somebodyjdn eines Verbrechens bezichtigen

impute

[ɪmˈpjuːt] vt (frm) to impute (to) (change, development) → attribuire (a); (crime, blame) → imputare (a)
References in classic literature ?
Distrust naturally creates distrust, and by nothing is good-will and kind conduct more speedily changed than by invidious jealousies and uncandid imputations, whether expressed or implied.
The just imputations on our own faith, in respect to the same treaty, ought first to be removed.
Irritated as I was at their foolish mirth and vexatious imputations, the uneasiness did not continue long: when they had had their laugh out, they returned again to the captain and lieutenant; and, while they disputed and commented upon them, my indignation rapidly cooled; the cause of it was quickly forgotten, and I turned my thoughts into a pleasanter channel.
Altho' I cannot agree with you in supposing that I shall never again be exposed to Misfortunes as unmerited as those I have already experienced, yet to avoid the imputation of Obstinacy or ill-nature, I will gratify the curiosity of your daughter; and may the fortitude with which I have suffered the many afflictions of my past Life, prove to her a useful lesson for the support of those which may befall her in her own.
From even the barely hinted imputation of usurpation, and the possible consequences of such a suppressed impression gaining ground, Ahab must of course have been most anxious to protect himself.
And of all princes, it is impossible for the new prince to avoid the imputation of cruelty, owing to new states being full of dangers.
I take the imputation in good part, as a compliment to the just delineation of my female characters; and though I am bound to attribute much of the severity of my censors to this suspicion, I make no effort to refute it, because, in my own mind, I am satisfied that if a book is a good one, it is so whatever the sex of the author may be.
To avoid, therefore, all imputation of laying down a rule for posterity, founded only on the authority of
Miss Temple, having assembled the whole school, announced that inquiry had been made into the charges alleged against Jane Eyre, and that she was most happy to be able to pronounce her completely cleared from every imputation.
Still further to screen her husband from any imputation on unkindness to her, she took twenty-five of the fifty pounds Clare had given her, and handed the sum over to her mother, as if the wife of a man like Angel Clare could well afford it, saying that it was a slight return for the trouble and humiliation she had brought upon them in years past.
Then, when our ammunition was gone and the Klondiker, still somewhat sober, began to babble again of Milly, Kraft whispered into his ear such a polite, barbed insult relating to people who were miserly with their funds, that the miner crashed down handful after handful of silver and notes, calling for all the fluids in the world to drown the imputation.
She resents, for all the world like some high little personage, the imputation on her truthfulness and, as it were, her respectability.