impute


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impute

to attribute or ascribe something discreditable: He imputed the error to the salesperson.
Not to be confused with:
impugn – to attack as untrue; censure; malign; to cast doubt upon: Her reputation was impugned.

im·pute

 (ĭm-pyo͞ot′)
tr.v. im·put·ed, im·put·ing, im·putes
1. To relate (something, usually something bad) to a particular cause or source; place the fault or responsibility for: imputed the rocket failure to a faulty gasket; kindly imputed my clumsiness to inexperience. See Synonyms at attribute.
2. To assign as a characteristic; credit: the gracefulness so often imputed to cats.

[Middle English imputen, from Old French emputer, from Latin imputāre : in-, in; see in-2 + putāre, to settle an account; see pau- in Indo-European roots.]

impute

(ɪmˈpjuːt)
vb (tr)
1. to attribute or ascribe (something dishonest or dishonourable, esp a criminal offence) to a person
2. to attribute to a source or cause: I impute your success to nepotism.
3. (Commerce) commerce to give (a notional value) to goods or services when the real value is unknown
[C14: from Latin imputāre, from im- + putāre to think, calculate]
ˌimpuˈtation n
imˈputative adj
imˈputatively adv
imˈputer n

im•pute

(ɪmˈpyut)

v.t. -put•ed, -put•ing.
1. to attribute or ascribe: The children imputed magical powers to the old woman.
2. to attribute or ascribe (something discreditable) to someone or something.
3. to attribute (righteousness, guilt, etc.) to a person or persons vicariously.
4. to charge (a person) with fault.
[1325–75; Middle English < Latin imputāre=im- im-1 + putāre to assess, think; see putative]
im•put′a•ble, adj.
im•put′er, n.
syn: See attribute.

impute


Past participle: imputed
Gerund: imputing

Imperative
impute
impute
Present
I impute
you impute
he/she/it imputes
we impute
you impute
they impute
Preterite
I imputed
you imputed
he/she/it imputed
we imputed
you imputed
they imputed
Present Continuous
I am imputing
you are imputing
he/she/it is imputing
we are imputing
you are imputing
they are imputing
Present Perfect
I have imputed
you have imputed
he/she/it has imputed
we have imputed
you have imputed
they have imputed
Past Continuous
I was imputing
you were imputing
he/she/it was imputing
we were imputing
you were imputing
they were imputing
Past Perfect
I had imputed
you had imputed
he/she/it had imputed
we had imputed
you had imputed
they had imputed
Future
I will impute
you will impute
he/she/it will impute
we will impute
you will impute
they will impute
Future Perfect
I will have imputed
you will have imputed
he/she/it will have imputed
we will have imputed
you will have imputed
they will have imputed
Future Continuous
I will be imputing
you will be imputing
he/she/it will be imputing
we will be imputing
you will be imputing
they will be imputing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been imputing
you have been imputing
he/she/it has been imputing
we have been imputing
you have been imputing
they have been imputing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been imputing
you will have been imputing
he/she/it will have been imputing
we will have been imputing
you will have been imputing
they will have been imputing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been imputing
you had been imputing
he/she/it had been imputing
we had been imputing
you had been imputing
they had been imputing
Conditional
I would impute
you would impute
he/she/it would impute
we would impute
you would impute
they would impute
Past Conditional
I would have imputed
you would have imputed
he/she/it would have imputed
we would have imputed
you would have imputed
they would have imputed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.impute - attribute or credit toimpute - attribute or credit to; "We attributed this quotation to Shakespeare"; "People impute great cleverness to cats"
pass judgment, evaluate, judge - form a critical opinion of; "I cannot judge some works of modern art"; "How do you evaluate this grant proposal?" "We shouldn't pass judgment on other people"
impute - attribute (responsibility or fault) to a cause or source; "The teacher imputed the student's failure to his nervousness"
carnalize, sensualize - ascribe to an origin in sensation
credit - give someone credit for something; "We credited her for saving our jobs"
reattribute - attribute to another source
anthropomorphise, anthropomorphize - ascribe human features to something
personate, personify - attribute human qualities to something; "The Greeks personated their gods ridiculous"
credit, accredit - ascribe an achievement to; "She was not properly credited in the program"
blame, charge - attribute responsibility to; "We blamed the accident on her"; "The tragedy was charged to her inexperience"
externalise, externalize, project - regard as objective
interiorise, interiorize, internalise, internalize - incorporate within oneself; make subjective or personal; "internalize a belief"
2.impute - attribute (responsibility or fault) to a cause or source; "The teacher imputed the student's failure to his nervousness"
ascribe, attribute, impute, assign - attribute or credit to; "We attributed this quotation to Shakespeare"; "People impute great cleverness to cats"

impute

verb attribute, assign, ascribe, credit, refer, accredit It is unfair to impute blame to the employees.

impute

verb
1. To ascribe (a misdeed or an error, for example) to:
2. To regard as belonging to or resulting from another:
Translations

impute

[ɪmˈpjuːt] VT to impute sth to sbimputar or atribuir algo a algn

impute

[ɪmˈpjuːt] vt (= attribute) → imputer
to impute blame to sb → imputer la responsabilité à qn

impute

vtzuschreiben (to sb/sth jdm/einer Sache); to impute a crime to somebodyjdn eines Verbrechens bezichtigen

impute

[ɪmˈpjuːt] vt (frm) to impute (to) (change, development) → attribuire (a); (crime, blame) → imputare (a)
References in classic literature ?
"Ascribe it all to that fatal, heart-thrilling, hope-inspiring 'yes,' loveliest of human females," continued Tom, kneeling with some caution, lest the straps of his pantaloons should give way--"Impute all to your own lucid ambiguity, and to the torments of hope that I experience.
"Finally one cannot impute the nonreceipt of our dispatch of November 18.
Observation: The Tax Court has made it clear that the IRS can impute interest under Sec.
(2004) explicitly examined this issue with respect to state survey estimates of health insurance coverage, finding that the process used by the Census Bureau to impute missing insurance data in the ASEC biases the state estimates of uninsurance.
All expenses for recreation, entertainment or amusement use by "specified individuals" are disallowed unless those individuals impute the aggregate value as income on their W-2.
The flip-side risk that the IRS may impute such arrangements to adjust results in situations where the parties did not explicitly so contract remains, with only a very limited IRS disclaimer in the Preamble (see E below).
Also, trial courts routinely impute income to a mischievous spouse to correct the intentional manipulation of income.
Improvements in the method used to impute values were implemented in the March 2006 index, along with other changes--including the switch in industry classification from the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) to the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), and the switch from the Occupational Classification System (OCS) to the Standard Occupational Classification (SOC).
Description: Find similar records in the database and using them to impute the missing values.
A simulation study was conducted to identify the best hot-deck variation to impute missing values.
In step one, multi-pattern (different permutation patterns of missing SF-12 items) regressions were performed to impute SF-12 PCS and MCS scores (Little and Rubin 1987; Goldstein 1996; StataCorp 1999).
Two possible methods of doing so are to impute a measure of the highest grade completed, using responses to the new question, and to recode responses to both questions, to provide comparable aggregate categories.(2) This report presents a summary account of these methods.