in effect


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ef·fect

 (ĭ-fĕkt′)
n.
1. Something brought about by a cause or agent; a result.
2. The power to produce an outcome or achieve a result: The government's action had little effect on the trade imbalance.
3. Advantage; avail: used her words to great effect in influencing the jury.
4. The condition of being in full force or execution; operativeness: a new regulation that goes into effect tomorrow.
5.
a. Something that produces a specific impression or supports a general design or intention: The lighting effects emphasized the harsh atmosphere of the drama.
b. A particular impression: large windows that gave an effect of spaciousness.
c. Production of a desired impression: spent lavishly on dinner just for effect.
6. The basic or general meaning; import: He said he was greatly worried, or words to that effect.
7. effects Movable belongings; goods.
tr.v. ef·fect·ed, ef·fect·ing, ef·fects
To bring about; make happen; cause or accomplish: effect a cure for a disease; effect a change in policy. See Usage Note at affect1.
Idioms:
in effect
In essence; to all purposes: testimony that in effect contradicted her earlier statement.
to the effect that
With the general meaning that: He said something to the effect that he was sorry.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin effectus, from past participle of efficere, to accomplish : ex-, ex- + facere, to make; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]

ef·fect′er n.
ef·fect′i·ble adj.
Synonyms: effect, consequence, result, outcome, upshot
These nouns denote an occurrence, situation, or condition that is produced by a cause or agent. Effect stresses the idea of influence or alteration: a drug whose main effect is to lower hypertension; increased erosion that was the effect of deforestation.
A consequence follows naturally or logically from its cause: a broken wrist that was the consequence of a fall; a reduction in crime that was the consequence of better policing.
A result is viewed as the end product of the operation of the cause: improved his grades as a result of better study habits; an experiment with an unexpected result.
An outcome more strongly implies finality and may suggest the resolution of a complex or lengthy process: The trial's outcome might have changed if the defendant had testified.
An upshot is a decisive result, often of the nature of a climax: "The upshot of the matter ... was that she showed both of them the door" (Robert Louis Stevenson).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.in effect - exerting force or influence; "the law is effective immediately"; "a warranty good for two years"; "the law is already in effect (or in force)"
operative - being in force or having or exerting force; "operative regulations"; "the major tendencies operative in the American political system"
Adv.1.in effect - in actuality or reality or fact; "she is effectively his wife"; "in effect, they had no choice"
Translations
ساري المَفْعول، فَعّالفِعْلِيّا، عَمَلِيّا
gældendei kraft
hatályban
í gildií raun
doğrusugerçekteyürürlükte

effect

(iˈfekt) noun
1. a result or consequence. He is suffering from the effects of over-eating; His discovery had little effect at first.
2. an impression given or produced. The speech did not have much effect (on them); a pleasing effect.
verb
to make happen; to bring about. He tried to effect a reconciliation between his parents.
efˈfective (-tiv) adjective
1. having power to produce, or producing, a desired result. These new teaching methods have proved very effective.
2. striking or pleasing. an effective display of flowers.
3. in operation; working; active. The new law becomes effective next week.
efˈfectively (-tivli) adverb
efˈfects noun plural
1. property; goods. She left few personal effects when she died.
2. in drama etc, devices for producing suitable sounds, lighting etc to accompany a play etc. sound effects.
efˈfectual (-tʃuəl) adjective
successful in producing the desired results. He was not very effectual as an organiser.
come into effect
(of a law etc) to begin to operate. The law came into effect last month.
for effect
for the sake of making an impression. You don't mean that – you only said it for effect.
in effect
1. (of a rule etc) in operation. That law is no longer in effect.
2. in truth or in practical terms. In effect our opinions differed very little.
put into effect
to put (a law etc) into operation. He has begun to put his theories into effect.
take effect
to begin to work; to come into force. When will the drug take effect?
References in periodicals archive ?
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The Labor Relations System will be implemented for all bargaining unit employees shortly after the enabling regulations are in effect. The Human Resources System and the appeals process will be phased in once implementing issuances are in place and training is underway.