midst

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midst

core, heart; occurring in the middle: She arrived at the theater in the midst of the performance.; course of action
Not to be confused with:
missed – failed to hit: missed the target; regretted the loss or absence of: She missed her classmates.; failed to be present: missed church
mist – cloud; a fine spray; to rain in very fine drops; something that dims or obscures: The mist of passion blurred his reason.
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

midst

 (mĭdst, mĭtst)
n.
1. The middle position or part; the center: in the midst of the desert.
2. A position of proximity to others: a stranger in our midst.
3. The condition of being surrounded or beset by something: in the midst of all of our problems.
4. A period of time approximately in the middle of a continuing condition or act: in the midst of the war.
prep.
Among; amid.

[Middle English middes, middest : alteration of Old English midde, middle; see medhyo- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

midst

(mɪdst)
n
1. in the midst of surrounded or enveloped by; at a point during, esp a climactic one
2. in our midst among us
3. archaic the centre
[C14: back formation from amiddes amid]

midst

(mɪdst)
prep
poetic See amid
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

midst1

(mɪdst)

n.
1. the position of anything surrounded by or among other things or parts (usu. prec. by the): in the midst of the crowd.
2. the position of something occurring in the middle of or during a period of time, course of action, etc. (usu. prec. by the): in the midst of the concert.
3. the state of being surrounded by or engaged in (usu. prec. by the): in the midst of work.
4. the middle point or part.
[1350–1400; Middle English, =middes (variant of amiddes amidst) + excrescent -t]

midst2

(mɪdst)

prep.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.midst - the location of something surrounded by other thingsmidst - the location of something surrounded by other things; "in the midst of the crowd"
inside, interior - the region that is inside of something
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

midst

noun middle, centre, heart, interior, thick, depths, core, hub, bosom The organisation realised it had a traitor in its midst.
in the midst of among, during, in the middle of, surrounded by, amidst, in the thick of, enveloped by She arrived in the midst of a blizzard.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

midst

noun
1. A point or an area equidistant from all sides of something:
2. The most intensely active central part:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
بَين، في مَرْكِزفي غَمْرَة
uprostřed
midt imidt iblandtmidt under
á meîanmiîja; í miîju
jų aplinkojejūsų aplinkojemūsų aplinkojevienu metu su
vidū, starpvienlaicīgi
arasındaesnasındaortasındasırasında

midst

[mɪdst]
A. N in the midst of (place) → en medio de, a mitad de (LAm)
in the midst of the battle (fig) → en plena batalla
in our midstentre nosotros
B. PREP (liter) = amidst
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

midst

[ˈmɪdst] n
in our midst (= among us) → en notre sein (formal), parmi nous
in their midst (= among them) → en leur sein (formal), parmi eux
in the midst of [+ place] → au milieu de; [+ situation] → en plein(e)
In the midst of the scandal, news broke of her resignation → En plein scandale, la nouvelle de sa démission éclata.
to be in the midst of doing sth → être en train de faire qch
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

midst

nMitte f; in the midst ofmitten in; we are in the midst of an economic crisiswir stecken mitten in einer Wirtschaftskrise; and in the midst of our troubles Grandpa diedund zu allem Unglück starb noch Großvater; in our midstunter uns, in unserer Mitte (geh); in the midst of life (we are in death) (Bibl) → mitten im Leben sind wir vom Tod umgeben
prep (old poet) = amid(st)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

midst

[mɪdst] n in the midst ofin mezzo a; (during) → durante
in our midst → tra di noi, in mezzo a noi
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

midst

(midst) : in the midst of
1. among or in the centre of. in the midst of a crowd of people.
2. at the same time as. in the midst of all these troubles.
in our/your/their midst
among, or in the same place as, us, you or them. Large buildings keep rising in our midst.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Do they really think that by upping the price of rot-gut plonk they will cut down the shameful amount of drunkenness in our midst? All that's going to happen is the crime figures will rise as more and more people turn to the obvious way to get cash to feed their habit.
But proclamations, as Jayapal knew, would not be enough to stem the tide of hate crimes and the impact of federal edicts geared toward the new "aliens" in our midst. In quick succession, the Department of Justice (DOJ) and Congress passed laws and regulations ostensibly designed to rein in terrorism.
When some visitors to the country, who privately disparage public, mainstream culture, engaged in an act of criminal violence against that culture, many citizens embraced an all too familiar response: find and expel the foreigners in our midst. Bush administration supporters maintain that, since these "intruders" are here either illegally or as "guests," our government need not observe many of the nuances of law in dealing with them.