in the aggregate


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ag·gre·gate

 (ăg′rĭ-gĭt)
adj.
1. Constituting or amounting to a whole; total: aggregate sales in that market.
2. Botany Crowded or massed into a dense cluster.
3. Composed of a mixture of minerals separable by mechanical means.
n.
1. A total considered with reference to its constituent parts; a gross amount: "An empire is the aggregate of many states under one common head" (Edmund Burke).
2. The mineral materials, such as sand or stone, used in making concrete.
v. (-gāt′) ag·gre·gat·ed, ag·gre·gat·ing, ag·gre·gates
v.tr.
1. To gather into a mass, sum, or whole: aggregated the donations into one bank account.
2. To amount to; total: Revenues will aggregate more than one million dollars.
3. To collect (content from different sources on the internet) into one webpage or newsreader.
v.intr.
To come together or collect in a mass or whole: "Some [bacteria]aggregate so closely as to mimic a multicellular organism" (Gina Kolata). "The first stars began to form when hydrogen and helium gas left over from the Big Bang aggregated into dense clouds" (Paul Davies).
Idiom:
in the aggregate
Taken into account as a whole: Unit sales for December amounted in the aggregate to 100,000.

[Middle English aggregat, from Latin aggregātus, past participle of aggregāre, to add to : ad-, ad- + gregāre, to collect (from grex, greg-, flock; see ger- in Indo-European roots).]

ag′gre·gate·ly adv.
ag′gre·ga′tion n.
ag′gre·ga′tive adj.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Perceiving further, that in order to understand these relations I should sometimes have to consider them one by one and sometimes only to bear them in mind, or embrace them in the aggregate, I thought that, in order the better to consider them individually, I should view them as subsisting between straight lines, than which I could find no objects more simple, or capable of being more distinctly represented to my imagination and senses; and on the other hand, that in order to retain them in the memory or embrace an aggregate of many, I should express them by certain characters the briefest possible.
The steamship lines were carrying Americans out of the various ports of the country at the rate of four or five thousand a week in the aggregate.
In the ease of Turlington's house, the foreign merchants had drawn their bills on him for sums large in the aggregate, if not large in themselves; had long since turned those bills into cash in their own markets, for their own necessities; and had now left the money which their paper represented to be paid by their London correspondents as it fell due.