inartistic


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in·ar·tis·tic

 (ĭn′är-tĭs′tĭk)
adj.
1. Not conforming to the principles or criteria of art: "Never would she resort to the inartistic expedient of modifying her work to suit the popular taste" (Edith Wharton).
2. Lacking taste or interest in art.

in′ar·tis′tic·al·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

inartistic

(ˌɪnɑːˈtɪstɪk)
adj
lacking in artistic skill, appreciation, etc; Philistine
ˌinarˈtistically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•ar•tis•tic

(ˌɪn ɑrˈtɪs tɪk)

adj.
1. not artistic.
2. lacking in artistic sense or appreciation.
[1855–60]
in`ar•tis′ti•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.inartistic - lacking aesthetic sensibilityinartistic - lacking aesthetic sensibility;  
inaesthetic, unaesthetic - violating aesthetic canons or requirements; deficient in tastefulness or beauty; "inaesthetic and quite unintellectual"; "peered through those inaesthetic spectacles"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

inartistic

[ɪnɑːˈtɪstɪk] ADJ [work] → poco artístico, antiestético; [person] → falto de talento artístico
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

inartistic

adj, inartistically
advunkünstlerisch; work alsokunstlos
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

inartistic

[ˌɪnɑːˈtɪstɪk] adj (work) → di scarso valore artistico; (person) → che manca di senso artistico
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
You will get no finish from either -- the lines are often blurred, the design but half fulfilled; and yet the effect is not inartistic. It has been well said that greatness is but another name for interpretation; and in so far as these nameless workmen of old interpreted themselves and the times in which they lived, they have attained enduring greatness.
A want of keeping is observable sometimes in the character of the several pieces of furniture, but generally in their colours or modes of adaptation to use Very often the eye is offended by their inartistic arrangement.
His best stories, essays, and poems went begging among them, and yet, each month, he read reams of dull, prosy, inartistic stuff between all their various covers.
It deals largely with their flowers, which are commonly badly designed, inartistic in color, and ill- smelling.
It's too inartistic. "A Napoleon creep under an old woman's bed!
I fancy that the true explanation is this: It often happens that the real tragedies of life occur in such an inartistic manner that they hurt us by their crude violence, their absolute incoherence, their absurd want of meaning, their entire lack of style.
But interest seldom greatly slackens until the end, which, it must be further confessed, is often suddenly brought about in a very inartistic fashion.
As an art, architecture should be distinguished from inartistic plain building.
Agencies such as the police force or law enforcement agencies are more suited for taking factual, inartistic photographs and understandably for their legal/security purposes.
Such an extraction maneuver is inartistic and show[s] a lack of regard for the mechanical factors involved in the mechanism of labor.
Conrad felt Melville's long-winded, pedantic, and pompous digressions were irritating, inappropriate in a novel, and crudely inartistic. To Conrad, who belonged to the high-art, mot juste tradition of Turgenev, Flaubert, and Ford Madox Ford, the sea was a setting, not a subject.