inaugural

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in·au·gu·ral

 (ĭn-ô′gyər-əl, -gər-)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or characteristic of an inauguration.
2. Initial; first: the inaugural issue of a magazine.
n.
1. An inauguration.
2. A speech given by a person being formally inducted into office.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

inaugural

(ɪnˈɔːɡjʊrəl)
adj
(Education) characterizing or relating to an inauguration
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a speech made at an inauguration, esp by a president of the US
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•au•gu•ral

(ɪnˈɔ gyər əl, -gər əl)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to an inauguration.
2. marking the beginning of a new venture, series, etc.: the inaugural run of the pony express.
n.
3. an address, as of a president, at the beginning of a term of office.
4. an inaugural ceremony.
[1680–90; obsolete inaugure (< Latin inaugurāre to inaugurate) + -al1, -al2]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inaugural - an address delivered at an inaugural ceremony (especially by a United States president)inaugural - an address delivered at an inaugural ceremony (especially by a United States president)
inaugural, inauguration - the ceremonial induction into a position; "the new president obviously enjoyed his inauguration"
speech, address - the act of delivering a formal spoken communication to an audience; "he listened to an address on minor Roman poets"
U.S.A., United States, United States of America, US, USA, America, the States, U.S. - North American republic containing 50 states - 48 conterminous states in North America plus Alaska in northwest North America and the Hawaiian Islands in the Pacific Ocean; achieved independence in 1776
2.inaugural - the ceremonial induction into a position; "the new president obviously enjoyed his inauguration"
inaugural, inaugural address - an address delivered at an inaugural ceremony (especially by a United States president)
induction, initiation, installation - a formal entry into an organization or position or office; "his initiation into the club"; "he was ordered to report for induction into the army"; "he gave a speech as part of his installation into the hall of fame"
Adj.1.inaugural - occurring at or characteristic of a formal investiture or induction; "the President's inaugural address"; "an inaugural ball"
exaugural - occurring at or marking the close of a term of office; "an exaugural message"
2.inaugural - serving to set in motioninaugural - serving to set in motion; "the magazine's inaugural issue"; "the initiative phase in the negotiations"; "an initiatory step toward a treaty"; "his first (or maiden) speech in Congress"; "the liner's maiden voyage"
opening - first or beginning; "the memorable opening bars of Beethoven's Fifth"; "the play's opening scene"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

inaugural

adjective first, opening, initial, maiden, introductory, dedicatory In his inaugural address, he appealed for understanding.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

inaugural

noun
The act or process of formally admitting a person to membership or office:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
إفْتِتاحي
inaugurační
åbnings-indsættelses-indvielses-
fölavató
innsetningar-; opnunar-
inauguračný
açılışaçılışla ilgili

inaugural

[ɪˈnɔːgjʊrəl] ADJ [lecture, debate] → inaugural; [speech] → de apertura
the president's inaugural addressel discurso de investidura or de toma de posesión del presidente
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

inaugural

[ɪnˈɔːgjʊrəl] adj [lecture, speech] → inaugural(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

inaugural

adj lectureAntritts-; meeting, address, speechEröffnungs-
n (= speech)Antritts-/Eröffnungsrede f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

inaugural

[ɪˈnɔːgjʊrl] adjinaugurale
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

inaugurate

(iˈnoːgjureit) verb
1. to place (a person) in an official position with great ceremony. to inaugurate a president.
2. to make a ceremonial start to. This meeting is to inaugurate our new Social Work scheme.
3. to open (a building, exhibition etc) formally to the public. The Queen inaugurated the new university buildings.
iˌnauguˈration noun
iˈnaugural adjective
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
While the inaugural address was being delivered from this place, devoted altogether to saving the Union without war, insurgent agents were in the city seeking to destroy it without war-- seeking to dissolve the Union, and divide effects, by negotiation.
Inaugurals held in front of the Legislative Building (now National Museum):
Six presidents-Quezon (1941), Quirino (1949), Magsaysay (1953), Garcia (1957), Macapagal (1961), Marcos (1965 and 1969)- had inaugurals on Dec.
Such partisanship, even when diluted, is rare in Inaugurals and was already deprecated by Washington's successor, John Adams.
But it is the positive which is accentuated in Inaugurals, not the negative, especially in moments of great crisis.
Such a balance of seriousness and celebration has quelled criticism in past inaugurals held in the midst of crisis: Even Franklin Roosevelt, coming into office during the depths of the Depression in 1933, threw a ball.
We compared values mentioned during nineteenth-century inaugurals versus twentieth-century inaugurals and by Republicans versus Democrats.
In fact, the vessel's inaugural made such a splash everywhere that when one of us unexpectedly had to visit a doctor shoreside in Greece, the physician couldn't resist asking the patient, "What is it like to be on the world's biggest ship?" The Grand Princess's flawless first sailing, coupled with the postponement that had dashed the hopes of thousands of passengers, sums up the good and the bad about inaugurals.
Twenty of the first thirty inaugurals refer to the cooperation with Congress theme but only six of the last twenty-two inaugurals refer to it (for a total of 50 percent).
If we are to go by the template set by previous inaugurals, the procedure goes roughly like this: The president-elect arrives in Malacanang and meets with the outgoing president.
Other inaugurals held elsewhere in Manila were those of Corazon Aquino in 1986 at Club Filipino and Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo in 2001 at the Edsa Shrine.
Every president, no matter the party, taps into this civil religion when taking the oath and delivering his inaugural, a ceremony sociologist Robert Bellah called the religious legitimation of the highest political authority.