incantation

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in·can·ta·tion

 (ĭn′kăn-tā′shən)
n.
1. Ritual recitation of verbal charms or spells to produce a magic effect.
2.
a. A formula used in ritual recitation; a verbal charm or spell.
b. A conventionalized utterance repeated without thought or aptness; a formula: the pious incantations of the administration.

[Middle English incantacioun, from Old French incantation, from Late Latin incantātiō, incantātiōn-, spell, from Latin incantātus, past participle of incantāre, to enchant; see enchant.]

in′can·ta′tion·al adj.
in·can′ta·to′ry (-tə-tôr′ē) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

incantation

(ˌɪnkænˈteɪʃən)
n
1. ritual recitation of magic words or sounds
2. the formulaic words or sounds used; a magic spell
[C14: from Late Latin incantātiō an enchanting, from incantāre to repeat magic formulas, from Latin, from in-2 + cantāre to sing; see enchant]
ˌincanˈtational adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•can•ta•tion

(ˌɪn kænˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the chanting or uttering of words purporting to have magical power.
2. the formula employed; spell.
3. repetitious words used to heighten an effect.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin incantātiō, derivative of Latin incantā(re) to put a spell on, bewitch; see enchant]
in`can•ta′tion•al, in•can′ta•to`ry (-təˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.incantation - a ritual recitation of words or sounds believed to have a magical effectincantation - a ritual recitation of words or sounds believed to have a magical effect
magic spell, magical spell, charm, spell - a verbal formula believed to have magical force; "he whispered a spell as he moved his hands"; "inscribed around its base is a charm in Balinese"
invocation - an incantation used in conjuring or summoning a devil
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

incantation

noun chant, spell, charm, formula, invocation, hex (U.S. & Canad. informal), abracadabra, conjuration huddled shapes whispering strange incantations
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
تَعْويذَه، رُقيَه
zaklínadlozaříkávání
trylleformular
varázsige
særingaròula
burtažodžiai
buramvārdi
zariekať

incantation

[ˌɪnkænˈteɪʃən] Nconjuro m, ensalmo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

incantation

nZauber(spruch) m, → Zauberformel f; (= act)Beschwörung f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

incantation

[ˌɪnkænˈteɪʃn] nincantesimo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

incantation

(inkӕnˈteiʃən) noun
words said or sung as a spell.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Numbers enter into the musicality of "Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking," where "two" and "two together" in the second, third, and fourth stanzas enrich the incantational, rhythmic character, both musical and mathematical, of the poem (33).
In the book, Christ-centered Empathic Resistance, the Influence of Harlem Renaissance Theology on the Incantational Ethics of Dietrich Bonhoeffer, (2011) author Reggie L.
It is she who speaks for the most part, and her language is hieratic and incantational, as if her story were to be intoned, rather than merely spoken.
(37.) Some justifications for narrowly construing public use seem merely incantational. The South Carolina Supreme Court takes the view that even if a planned project has undeniable, significant economic benefits for a local government, eminent domain cannot be used because "the use of the power of eminent domain for such purposes runs squarely into the right of an individual to own property and use it as he pleases." Georgia Dep't of Trans.
In a darkened corner of the stage, the figure of the sorcerer is to be seen working before his altar, accompanied by eerie music, a chanting, incantational song, and smouldering incense.
There is a hortatory, even incantational, power that attaches to obscure vocabulary from ancient or otherwise unknown languages, as soothsayers and seers the world over seem to be aware.