incarcerate

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in·car·cer·ate

 (ĭn-kär′sə-rāt′)
tr.v. in·car·cer·at·ed, in·car·cer·at·ing, in·car·cer·ates
1. To put in a prison or jail.
2. To shut in; confine.

[Medieval Latin incarcerāre, incarcerāt- : Latin in-, in; see in-2 + Latin carcer, prison.]

in·car′cer·a′tion n.
in·car′cer·a′tor n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

incarcerate

(ɪnˈkɑːsəˌreɪt)
vb
(tr) to confine or imprison
[C16: from Medieval Latin incarcerāre, from Latin in-2 + carcer prison]
inˌcarcerˈation n
inˈcarcerˌator n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•car•cer•ate

(ɪnˈkɑr səˌreɪt)

v.t. -at•ed, -at•ing.
1. to imprison; confine.
2. to enclose; constrict closely.
[1520–30; < Medieval Latin incarcerāre to imprison]
in•car`cer•a′tion, n.
in•car′cer•a`tive, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

incarcerate


Past participle: incarcerated
Gerund: incarcerating

Imperative
incarcerate
incarcerate
Present
I incarcerate
you incarcerate
he/she/it incarcerates
we incarcerate
you incarcerate
they incarcerate
Preterite
I incarcerated
you incarcerated
he/she/it incarcerated
we incarcerated
you incarcerated
they incarcerated
Present Continuous
I am incarcerating
you are incarcerating
he/she/it is incarcerating
we are incarcerating
you are incarcerating
they are incarcerating
Present Perfect
I have incarcerated
you have incarcerated
he/she/it has incarcerated
we have incarcerated
you have incarcerated
they have incarcerated
Past Continuous
I was incarcerating
you were incarcerating
he/she/it was incarcerating
we were incarcerating
you were incarcerating
they were incarcerating
Past Perfect
I had incarcerated
you had incarcerated
he/she/it had incarcerated
we had incarcerated
you had incarcerated
they had incarcerated
Future
I will incarcerate
you will incarcerate
he/she/it will incarcerate
we will incarcerate
you will incarcerate
they will incarcerate
Future Perfect
I will have incarcerated
you will have incarcerated
he/she/it will have incarcerated
we will have incarcerated
you will have incarcerated
they will have incarcerated
Future Continuous
I will be incarcerating
you will be incarcerating
he/she/it will be incarcerating
we will be incarcerating
you will be incarcerating
they will be incarcerating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been incarcerating
you have been incarcerating
he/she/it has been incarcerating
we have been incarcerating
you have been incarcerating
they have been incarcerating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been incarcerating
you will have been incarcerating
he/she/it will have been incarcerating
we will have been incarcerating
you will have been incarcerating
they will have been incarcerating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been incarcerating
you had been incarcerating
he/she/it had been incarcerating
we had been incarcerating
you had been incarcerating
they had been incarcerating
Conditional
I would incarcerate
you would incarcerate
he/she/it would incarcerate
we would incarcerate
you would incarcerate
they would incarcerate
Past Conditional
I would have incarcerated
you would have incarcerated
he/she/it would have incarcerated
we would have incarcerated
you would have incarcerated
they would have incarcerated
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.incarcerate - lock up or confine, in or as in a jail; "The suspects were imprisoned without trial"; "the murderer was incarcerated for the rest of his life"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
detain, confine - deprive of freedom; take into confinement
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

incarcerate

verb imprison, confine, detain, lock up, restrict, restrain, intern, send down (Brit.), impound, coop up, throw in jail, put under lock and key, immure, jail or gaol It can cost $50,000 to incarcerate a prisoner for a year.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

incarcerate

verb
To put in jail:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

incarcerate

[ɪnˈkɑːsəreɪt] VTencarcelar
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

incarcerate

[ɪnˈkɑːrsəreɪt] vtincarcérer
to be incarcerated → être incarcéré(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

incarcerate

vteinkerkern
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

incarcerate

[ɪnˈkɑːsəˌreɪt] vt (frm) → incarcerare
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
"Our findings point to the potentially high societal costs of incarcerating children's caregivers -- potentially for generations to come," said lead author Beth Gifford of Duke University and Copeland.
You would not know that by incarcerating those most responsible for the amount of crime in our community and the violence perpetrated against our fellow citizens saves our society and criminal justice system money by preventing additional crimes and victims.
States respond by incarcerating drug addicted women with little to no treatment.
America spends $80 billion a year incarcerating 2.4 million people.