incised


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in·cised

 (ĭn-sīzd′)
adj.
1. Cut into a surface; engraved.
2. Made with or as if with a sharp instrument.
3. Deeply and sharply cut: the incised margin of a leaf.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

incised

(ɪnˈsaɪzd)
adj
1. cut into or engraved: an incised surface.
2. made by cutting or engraving: an incised design.
3. (Pathology) (of a wound) cleanly cut, as with a surgical knife
4. (Botany) having margins that are sharply and deeply indented: an incised leaf.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•cised

(ɪnˈsaɪzd)

adj.
1. made by cutting; engraved: an incised pattern.
2. made or cut cleanly: an incised wound.
3. (of a leaf) sharply and irregularly notched.
[1590–1600]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.incised - sharply and deeply indented
compound - composed of more than one part; "compound leaves are composed of several lobes; "compound flower heads"
2.incised - cut into with a sharp instrument
cut - separated into parts or laid open or penetrated with a sharp edge or instrument; "the cut surface was mottled"; "cut tobacco"; "blood from his cut forehead"; "bandages on her cut wrists"
3.incised - cut or impressed into a surface; "an incised design"; "engraved invitations"
carved, carven - made for or formed by carving (`carven' is archaic or literary); "the carved fretwork"; "an intricately carved door"; "stood as if carven from stone"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

incised

a. cortado-a, inciso-a.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
"Is in not possible," I suggested, "that the incised would upon Straker may have been caused by his own knife in the convulsive struggles which follow any brain injury?"
The victim's body was discovered lying on the pavement with 'incised wounds' in front of Park Homes Subdivision in Barangay Tunasan at around 5:45 a.m.
Dr Johnson, a consultant pathologist with the Royal Liverpool University Hospital who also works for the Home Office, outlined the incised wounds (cuts), grazes and bruising he found on the victim during the postmortem examination he carried out.
Together, these measurements demonstrate that the studied river deposits once filled incised valleys.
The results indicate that microwave heating and steam injection drying could successfully dry incised teak and mahogany lumber.
This study was conducted to see the short term results of tubularized incised plate urethroplasty as described by Snodgrass in anterior hypospadias.
Despite having had no art training, she incised designs on pottery prior to painting it and her painted initials are said to be commonly found.
However, while it is easy to see the castle from the village, across the cricket field and the main road to the east of the castle, the amazing view of the castle from the river has gone and the view of the river from just below the castle keep has also gone - the two seats placed for the river view, again a prime example of an incised meander, face tree tops just feet away.
Consultant forensic pathologist Dr Brian Rogers conducted a post mortem and recorded the cause of death as shock and haemorrhaging as a result of multiple incised wounds to the neck and chest.
The head has a fine damascened decoration and the gilt handle has pierced and incised floral design.
"He's no more than 3-4 months old; it looks frightened, there are incised wounds on its body, and the paws are injured.