incisiform

incisiform

(ɪnˈsaɪzɪˌfɔːm)
adj
(Zoology) zoology having the shape of an incisor tooth
References in periodicals archive ?
Supplemental or eumorphic are the terms used to refer to supernumerary teeth of normal size and shape, which may also be termed incisiform. Rudimentary or dysmorphic are the terms used to describe teeth of abnormal shape and smaller size, including conical, tuberculate, and molariform teeth [6,10].
Supernumerary teeth of normal shape and size (eumorphic) are termed 'supplemental', or 'incisiform', whereas teeth of abnormal shape and size (dysmorphic), are termed 'rudimentary' and include 'conical', 'tuberculate' and 'molariform' teeth (3).
Supernumerary teeth of normal shape and size (eumorphic) are termed 'supplemental', or 'incisiform', whereas teeth of abnormal shape and smaller size (dysmorphic) are termed 'rudimentary' and include 'conical', 'tuberculate' and 'molariform' teeth(Primosch RE, 1981).
Local accounts of excessive tooth breakage (all moose >7 years old had broken incisiform teeth) and enamel defects in a declining moose population on the Seward Peninsula, Alaska raise special concern (Smith 1992, Rozell 2003, Stimmelmayr et al.
Incidence of incisiform tooth breakage among moose from the Seward Peninsula, Alaska, USA.
Mouth terminal, small, and oblique, forming an angle of about 36[degree] to horizontal axis of head and body; maxilla reaching vertical about even with anterior edge of orbit, upper-jaw length 3.1 (3.1-3.4) in HL; teeth of jaws uniserial posteriorly, becoming biserial at front of jaws with addition of slender buttress teeth in spaces between main row of larger teeth; teeth incisiform to conical in shape, about 36-38 in each jaw of holotype (excluding buttress teeth).
The pronghorn was probably >3 years old based on average length of his horns (34 cm; O'Gara, 2004a) and presence of eight large incisiform teeth (O'Gara, 2004b).
Mouth terminal, small and oblique, forming angle of about 35-40[degrees] to horizontal axis of head and body; maxilla reaching vertical about even with anterior edge of pupil, upper jaw length 3.5 (3.2-3.5) in HL; teeth of jaws uniserial posteriorly, becoming biserial at front of jaws with addition of slender buttress teeth in spaces between main row of larger teeth; teeth incisiform to conical in shape, about 34-36 (32-38) in each jaw (excluding buttress teeth).
Smith (1992) documented 'incisiform breakage' over a 2-year period (1988-1990), which closely resembles the breakage observed in Cape Breton Highlands moose.
We used incisor arcade width (the distance between the buccal surfaces of the incisiform canines, 14) as a proxy of body size for adult moose.
We assumed independence of contra-lateral teeth (Perzigian 1977) and therefore did not apply a Bonferroni correction for comparison of contra-lateral incisiform measurements.
Yearlings were the dominant age group without fracture lines (Left (L) = 75%; n = 13; Right (R) = 91%; n = 16) for [I.sub.1]; (L = 40%; n = 4; R = 91%; n = 6) for [I.sub.2]; the one yearling who had an [I.sub.3] contained no fractures in that tooth; no yearlings had an [I.sub.4], as their incisiform canines had not emerged.