inclement

(redirected from inclemencies)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

in·clem·ent

 (ĭn-klĕm′ənt)
adj.
1. Stormy: inclement weather.
2. Showing no clemency; unmerciful.

in·clem′en·cy n.
in·clem′ent·ly adv.

inclement

(ɪnˈklɛmənt)
adj
1. (of weather) stormy, severe, or tempestuous
2. harsh, severe, or merciless
inˈclemency, inˈclementness n
inˈclemently adv

in•clem•ent

(ɪnˈklɛm ənt)

adj.
1. severe; stormy: inclement weather.
2. not kind or merciful.
[1615–25; < Latin inclēment-, s. of inclemēns;]
in•clem′en•cy, in•clem′ent•ness, n.
in•clem′ent•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.inclement - (of weather or climate) severe
intemperate - (of weather or climate) not mild; subject to extremes; "an intemperate climate"; "intemperate zones"
clement - (of weather or climate) physically mild; "clement weather"
2.inclement - used of persons or behavior; showing no clemency or mercy; "the harsh sentence of an inclement judge"
merciless, unmerciful - having or showing no mercy; "the merciless enemy"; "a merciless critic"; "gave him a merciless beating"
clement - (used of persons or behavior) inclined to show mercy; "a more clement judge reduced the sentence"

inclement

adjective (Formal) stormy, severe, rough, foul, harsh, rigorous, boisterous, tempestuous, intemperate, bitter Thousands braved the inclement weather last week.
stormy fine, calm, pleasant, mild, clement, temperate, balmy
Translations
armotonmyrskyisäraivoisa
inclemens

inclement

[ɪnˈklemənt] ADJ [weather] → inclemente

inclement

[ɪnˈklɛmənt] adj [weather] → rude

inclement

adj weatherrau, unfreundlich

inclement

[ɪnˈklɛmənt] adjinclemente
References in classic literature ?
It is not, perhaps, easy for a reader, who hath never been in those circumstances, to imagine the horror with which darkness, rain, and wind, fill persons who have lost their way in the night; and who, consequently, have not the pleasant prospect of warm fires, dry cloaths, and other refreshments, to support their minds in struggling with the inclemencies of the weather.
The latter, generally French creoles, live comfortably in cabins and log-huts, well sheltered from the inclemencies of the seasons.
But, by that time, in consequence of fatigue, privations, ill-usage, the inclemencies of the weather, and the unhealthiness of the country, only eleven persons remained alive of the forty Europeans in the party.
The crew of each vessel made themselves a cabin of turf and wood, at some distance from each other, to fence themselves against the inclemencies of the weather, which was severe beyond imagination.
Working with the inclemencies of wind, sea and currents, are not excuses for the men and women of the Chilean Navy who throughout the year are in constant maintenance work in the remotest parts of the country.
The following Generations, who were not so fond of the Study of Cartography as their Forebears had been, saw that that vast Map was useless, and not without some Pitilessness was it, that they delivered it up to the Inclemencies of Sun and Winters (325).