incommodious


Also found in: Thesaurus.

in·com·mo·di·ous

 (ĭn′kə-mō′dē-əs)
adj.
Inconvenient or uncomfortable, as by not affording sufficient space.

in′com·mo′di·ous·ly adv.
in′com·mo′di·ous·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

incommodious

(ˌɪnkəˈməʊdɪəs)
adj
1. insufficiently spacious; cramped
2. troublesome or inconvenient
ˌincomˈmodiously adv
ˌincomˈmodiousness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•com•mo•di•ous

(ˌɪn kəˈmoʊ di əs)

adj.
uncomfortable.
[1545–55]
in`com•mo′di•ous•ly, adv.
in`com•mo′di•ous•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.incommodious - uncomfortably or inconveniently small; "incommodious hotel accommodations"
commodious, convenient - large and roomy (`convenient' is archaic in this sense); "a commodious harbor"; "a commodious building suitable for conventions"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

incommodious

adjective
Causing difficulty, trouble, or discomfort:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

incommodious

[ˌɪnkəˈməʊdɪəs] ADJ (frm) (= cramped) → estrecho, nada espacioso; (= inconvenient) → poco conveniente
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

incommodious

adj (form)lästig, unbequem; (= cramped)beengt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
It was very small, very dark, very ugly, very incommodious. It was an old-fashioned place, moreover, in the moral attribute that the partners in the House were proud of its smallness, proud of its darkness, proud of its ugliness, proud of its incommodiousness.
What a silly you must be!" a comment which Tommy followed up by seizing Dinah with both arms, and dancing along by her side with incommodious fondness.
Thus Slominski's ongoing project occupies an especially difficult (incommodious?) territory, one in which comedy and something close to horror are brought into proximity, and an oddly persistent art-historical motif demonstrates its continued utility.
Here, in endearing Toff-speak, are her suggestions (and 'incommodious' means causing inconvenience or discomfort if you're in any doubt).
that incommodious views such as disfigurement are also rendered more
He underwent incommodious intestinal resection on consideration of intestinal fistula and abdominal abscess.
They had to perform this mental calculus in order to avoid multiplying sins and punishments, such as, "Father, I ate meat on a Friday, but there was nothing else in the house." The casuists replied: an incommodious law does not bind.
[...] While it exists it is a manner of being felt and incommodious, and from which we have consequently a want of being delivered" (De Tracy, 2009, p.
Habermas, among others, has recently asked the incommodious (to put it mildly) question of "the future of human nature." (17) He placed this question in the bedrock of modern genetics and the inevitable--and as yet unforeseeable--changes that are to follow from the arrival of cloning and the genetic modification of human material.
The image of the Tellson Bank-musty, incommodious, cramped and ugly, totally hilarious--is as colorful as any similar Dickensian description.