incommunicability


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in·com·mu·ni·ca·ble

 (ĭn′kə-myo͞o′nĭ-kə-bəl)
adj.
1. Impossible to be transmitted; not communicable: an incommunicable disease.
2. Incommunicative: an executive who was maddeningly incommunicable.

in′com·mu′ni·ca·bil′i·ty n.
in′com·mu′ni·ca·bly adv.
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
1615-20, in which the dark void that separates the two protagonists heightens incommunicability.
All of these characters are variations of Phalaris's bull: their appeal to the reader depends at once on the incommunicability of their inner life, and on the aesthetic allure of our being able to overhear the inner in conflict with the outer.
It is concluded in this analysis of the mentality of the sub-proletarian "that the social system where he lives, receives its strength from its incommunicability with the outside world and from its own rigid internal hierarchy" (Borrelli, 1975: 14).
Amery was the author of a book called On Suicide, and Celan was a poet of agonizing incommunicability, and Kosinski's The Painted Bird was a surreal fantasia on themes of death and torture.
War was a story to Willa" (163; original emphasis), Sergeant realized, and yet the war experience was defined--as is trauma--by its incommunicability.
This is, of course, a result of incommunicability reading all the way down, since to be a person in what we might call the normative sense is not only to be a unified whole but to be meaningfully connected to all parts of oneself.
Does the possible incommunicability and experiential nature of their task make for infertile grounds for writing, especially for academic explorations?
1) Nevertheless, there are at least several distinguishing features of any genuinely personalist philosophy: a belief in the unbridgeable divide between persons and nonpersons, and in the inalienable dignity of the former; an emphasis on a person's incommunicability or uniqueness; a defense of the "personalist norm," which states that persons ought to be affirmed for their own sake (or ought never to be treated merely as means to an end); and, finally, the rejection of any political system that subordinates a person to the social whole or, conversely, that marginalizes a person's obligations toward the common good.
Resisting the comfortable illusion that there still is a way back; that memory can be restored and relived as present, or that the future can ever present something other than memory, Lidia responds to emotionally void desire with the burden of everyday banalities by physically resigning herself to a state of utter loss and insuperable incommunicability.
Time on My Hands pits the visible apathy of the adults and the invisible anger of the boys against each other, producing a generational clash fought by means of violent actions and puzzled reactions, as incommunicability rules and splits.
Zahle die Mandeln," which begins with a mechanical form of labeling, naming, and reference, exposes itself to the danger of incommunicability and yet eventually returns to countable objects.