inconcinnity

in·con·cin·ni·ty

 (ĭn′kən-sĭn′ĭ-tē)
n.
Lack of congruity or harmony; unsuitability.

inconcinnity

(ˌɪnkənˈsɪnɪtɪ)
n
a lack of concinnity; incongruity; lack of harmony or elegance
References in periodicals archive ?
By linking him to the water nymph through both Sappho and Homer, Apollonius underscores his inconcinnity in the Argonautica--a mighty epic hero trapped in a love poem.
Here Jerome's resort to flamboyant phrasing would accordingly appear to entail a certain infelicity: this kind of inconcinnity is characteristic of such Hieronymian borrowings from elsewhere (44).
Perhaps Shakespeare experienced a tension between his artistic ideal as a high-minded professional playwright aware of a critical, intelligent readership and the more immediate pressure, despite an occasional dramaturgical inconcinnity, to secure profits from live performance.
The literary quality of the essays turns them into little gems, whereas Schallenberger's interviews sometimes suffer from the repetitiveness, inconcinnity, and imprecision that characterize mundane speech.
Athena ostensibly so names her melody because it resembles the sounds issuing from the Gorgons' heads; but Pindar has her give this name to her melody because it resembles the name of a melody or mode of playing which existed in his own day, [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].(16) But the links he creates between the old and the new are purely verbal--and for good reason.(17) The inconcinnity of playing simultaneously a lament and a victory song (or shout) and the absurdity of imitating grieving Gorgons in order to celebrate a hero's victory may be lost on some of his interpreters, but were not lost on Pindar.
Consider the slight inconcinnity between the book's cover (a detail of William Blake's David Delivered) and the Preface's promise: 'The purpose of this introductory study is restoration; the text is to appear, I hope, with some of the freshness it once had.
The relative clauses are treated differently, but this serves as an agreeable inconcinnity in the overall parallel structure.
The thesis that Lucretius means his words to imitate the course of nature would explain one trait of style that is otherwise nothing but a recurring inconcinnity. If he inclines to state the same brief dogma more than once, and in an unchanged form of words,(22) is the reason not that the cardinal tenets of the doctrine, few in number like the atoms, were supposed to be sufficient, at the proper time and in proper combination, to refute whatever others might affirm?(23)
Jupiter's exclamation, naming the projected murder a "test," further betrays this inconcinnity. Indeed, it would be a mistake to expend too much cleverness in papering over what is so obviously a hole in the story, a loose end, if one will, for unraveling the entire weave Jupiter has so laboriously been fabricating.
134 `The inconcinnity spoils what the poet intended as a devastating line and raises a doubt about the accuracy of the manuscript tradition.' The objection is to the syntactical disharmony: Cynthia in apposition to a noun, Cynthia leuis as to a noun in the accusative of respect.
(17)Bomer too seems troubled by the phrase's logical inconcinnity. He quotes several passages using rete and laqueus, singly or together, from Ovid and from other authors, yet cannot find an exact parallel that would smoothly gloss the logical conflict in the phrase, and concludes rather weakly that "after Seneca's Phaedra" retia and laquei were "even synonymous" (ad 4.177).
Second, there is a logical inconcinnity: Jocasta found her sons alive, but (in a closely co-ordinated clause) took the sword from their corpses.