incorruption


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in•cor•rup•tion

(ˌɪn kəˈrʌp ʃən)

n. Archaic.
the quality or state of being incorrupt.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.incorruption - characterized by integrity or probity
honestness, honesty - the quality of being honest
References in classic literature ?
Now that the incorruption of this most fragrant ambergris should be found in the heart of such decay; is this nothing?
This is corroborated by Ben Sira, who was able to include in his extended polemic against evil women the statement "from a woman sin had its beginning, and because of her we all die" (Sirach 25:24) as well by as the Wisdom of Solomon, which likely predates Paul's writings by only a few years: "For God created us for incorruption, and made us in the image of his own eternity; but through the devil's envy death entered the world, and those who belong to his company experience it" (2:23-4).
Now that the incorruption of this most fragrant ambergris should be found in the heart of such decay; is this nothing?
Being unencumbered with pelf, Kirk is not distressed by that difficulty; his worn old knapsack will suffice him for the tramp from corruption to incorruption. In imagination, at least, may he be permitted to carry with him, into another realm of being, beyond time, his Mogul sword?
Barfield illustrates: We find poet after poet expressing in metaphor and simile the analogy between death and sleep and winter, and again between birth and waking and summer, and these, once more, are constantly made the types of a spiritual experience--of the death in the individual soul of its accidental part and the putting on of incorruption. [...] Now by our definition of a 'true metaphor', there should be some older, undivided 'meaning' from which all these logically disconnected, but poetically connected ideas have sprung.
Another biblical text seen as a divine flat to compose poetry in imitation of the celestial order was 1 Corinthians 15:53: "For this corruptible must put on incorruption, and this mortal must put on immortality."
This corruptible shall put on incorruption and this mortal immortality." (221) The reality is probably somewhere between the two accounts.
Tu helwete, hwar ar tin segher?" The King James version of the text reads: "So when this corruptible shall have put on incorruption, and this mortal has put on immortality, then shall it be brought to pass the saying that is written, Death is swallowed up in victory.
In his final response to Stillingfleet, Locke refused to determine what Paul chose not to say: "in what sort of body he shall appear, or of what particles made up, the Scripture having said nothing, but that it shall be a spiritual body raised in incorruption, it is not for me to determine." When Locke, five years later, paraphrases the Corinthians passage, he writes: "I knew a man by the power of Christ above 14 years agoe caught up into the third heaven, whether the entire man body and all or out of the body in an extasie I know not; god knows.
As Stubb proceeds with his "inquiry," Ishmael soliloquizes over the marvelous reversal of olfactory sensations in this "insufferable fetor": "Now that the incorruption of this most fragrant ambergris should be found in the heart of such decay; is this nothing?
It has also seen that awakening in terms of vestment--'For this corruptible must put on incorruption, and this mortal must put on immortality' (1 Corinthians 15.