incriminate

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Related to incriminations: incriminatory

in·crim·i·nate

 (ĭn-krĭm′ə-nāt′)
tr.v. in·crim·i·nat·ed, in·crim·i·nat·ing, in·crim·i·nates
1. To accuse of a crime or other wrongful act.
2. To cause to appear guilty of a crime or fault; implicate: testimony that incriminated the defendant.

[Late Latin incrīmināre, incrīmināt- : Latin in-, causative pref.; see in-2 + Latin crīmen, crīmin-, crime; see crime.]

in·crim′i·na′tion n.
in·crim′i·na·to′ry (-nə-tôr′ē) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

incriminate

(ɪnˈkrɪmɪˌneɪt)
vb (tr)
1. (Law) to imply or suggest the guilt or error of (someone)
2. (Law) to charge with a crime or fault
[C18: from Late Latin incrīmināre to accuse, from Latin crīmen accusation; see crime]
inˌcrimiˈnation n
inˈcrimiˌnator n
inˈcriminatory adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•crim•i•nate

(ɪnˈkrɪm əˌneɪt)

v.t. -nat•ed, -nat•ing.
to accuse of or indicate involvement in a crime or fault: The testimony of the defendant incriminated many others.
[1720–30; < Late Latin incrīminātus, past participle of incrīmināre to accuse. See in-2, criminate]
in•crim`i•na′tion, n.
in•crim′i•na`tor, n.
in•crim•i•na•to•ry (-nəˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

incriminate


Past participle: incriminated
Gerund: incriminating

Imperative
incriminate
incriminate
Present
I incriminate
you incriminate
he/she/it incriminates
we incriminate
you incriminate
they incriminate
Preterite
I incriminated
you incriminated
he/she/it incriminated
we incriminated
you incriminated
they incriminated
Present Continuous
I am incriminating
you are incriminating
he/she/it is incriminating
we are incriminating
you are incriminating
they are incriminating
Present Perfect
I have incriminated
you have incriminated
he/she/it has incriminated
we have incriminated
you have incriminated
they have incriminated
Past Continuous
I was incriminating
you were incriminating
he/she/it was incriminating
we were incriminating
you were incriminating
they were incriminating
Past Perfect
I had incriminated
you had incriminated
he/she/it had incriminated
we had incriminated
you had incriminated
they had incriminated
Future
I will incriminate
you will incriminate
he/she/it will incriminate
we will incriminate
you will incriminate
they will incriminate
Future Perfect
I will have incriminated
you will have incriminated
he/she/it will have incriminated
we will have incriminated
you will have incriminated
they will have incriminated
Future Continuous
I will be incriminating
you will be incriminating
he/she/it will be incriminating
we will be incriminating
you will be incriminating
they will be incriminating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been incriminating
you have been incriminating
he/she/it has been incriminating
we have been incriminating
you have been incriminating
they have been incriminating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been incriminating
you will have been incriminating
he/she/it will have been incriminating
we will have been incriminating
you will have been incriminating
they will have been incriminating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been incriminating
you had been incriminating
he/she/it had been incriminating
we had been incriminating
you had been incriminating
they had been incriminating
Conditional
I would incriminate
you would incriminate
he/she/it would incriminate
we would incriminate
you would incriminate
they would incriminate
Past Conditional
I would have incriminated
you would have incriminated
he/she/it would have incriminated
we would have incriminated
you would have incriminated
they would have incriminated
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.incriminate - suggest that someone is guilty
paint a picture, suggest, evoke - call to mind; "this remark evoked sadness"
2.incriminate - bring an accusation against; level a charge against; "The neighbors accused the man of spousal abuse"
reproach, upbraid - express criticism towards; "The president reproached the general for his irresponsible behavior"
accuse, charge - blame for, make a claim of wrongdoing or misbehavior against; "he charged the director with indifference"
arraign - accuse of a wrong or an inadequacy
recriminate - return an accusation against someone or engage in mutual accusations; charge in return
lodge, file, charge - file a formal charge against; "The suspect was charged with murdering his wife"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

incriminate

verb implicate, involve, accuse, blame, indict, point the finger at (informal), stigmatize, arraign, blacken the name of, inculpate He claimed that the drugs had been planted to incriminate him.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

incriminate

verb
1. To make an accusation against:
2. To cause to appear involved in or guilty of a crime or fault:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
يُجَرِّم، يَتَّهِم بِجُرْم
obvinit
anklage
syyttää
gyanúba kever
bendla viî glæp
inkriminavimasinkriminuojantisinkriminuoti
inkriminēt, apvainot
suçla mak

incriminate

[ɪnˈkrɪmɪneɪt] VTincriminar
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

incriminate

[ɪnˈkrɪmɪneɪt] vtincriminer, compromettre
to incriminate o.s. → se compromettre
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

incriminate

vtbelasten; he is afraid of incriminating himselfer hat Angst, dass er sich belasten könnte
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

incriminate

[ɪnˈkrɪmɪˌneɪt] vtincriminare
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

incriminate

(inˈkrimineit) verb
(of evidence) to show the involvement of (someone) in a crime etc.
inˈcriminating adjective
inˌcrimiˈnation noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cyprus has not made tangible progress in respect of any pending recommendation regarding Incriminations and Transparency of Party Funding since the adoption of the Second Compliance report, according to a report by the Council of Europe's Group of States Against Corruption (GRECO).
The organisation said one recommendation regarding incriminations remained partially implemented, as did five recommendations on party funding.
"Concerning incriminations, GRECO regrets in particular that no further progress has been achieved to create a more uniform legal framework for the criminalisation of corruption, which currently is made up of provisions contained in various laws and in two international treaties," the report said.
Cyprus was due to implement GRECO recommendations on incriminations and on transparency of party funding.
"In so far as incriminations are concerned, legislative reforms aimed at ensuring greater coherence of the existing provisions are to be commended", it is noted.
648, 665 & n.21 (1976) (concluding that "since Garner made disclosures instead of claiming the privilege on his tax returns his disclosures were not compelled incriminations.")).
(12) The Self-Incrimination Clause states that no person "shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself." (13) Under what Lance Cole described as "Fisher's new textualist analytical approach," (14) the Court has concluded that Fifth Amendment violations must contain three elements: compulsion, incrimination, and testimony.
GRECO's report covered two main themes, incriminations and transparency of party funding.
The incriminations theme was further broken down into three points: the criminalization of corruption, accessibility of criminal provisions, and harmonization with European anti-corruption legislation.