incurable


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in·cur·a·ble

 (ĭn-kyo͝or′ə-bəl)
adj.
1. Being such that a cure is impossible; not curable: an incurable disease.
2. Incapable of being altered, as in disposition or habits: an incurable optimist; an incurable smoker.

in·cur′a·bil′i·ty n.
in·cur′a·ble n.
in·cur′a·bly adv.

incurable

(ɪnˈkjʊərəbəl)
adj
(Pathology) (esp of a disease) not curable; unresponsive to treatment
n
(Pathology) a person having an incurable disease
inˌcuraˈbility, inˈcurableness n
inˈcurably adv

in•cur•a•ble

(ɪnˈkyʊər ə bəl)

adj.
1. not curable: an incurable disease.
2. not susceptible to change: incurable pessimism.
[1300–50; Middle English < Late Latin]
in•cur′a•bly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.incurable - a person whose disease is incurable
diseased person, sick person, sufferer - a person suffering from an illness
Adj.1.incurable - incapable of being cured; "an incurable disease"; "an incurable addiction to smoking"
curable - curing or healing is possible; "curable diseases"
2.incurable - unalterable in disposition or habits; "an incurable optimist"
inalterable, unalterable - not capable of being changed or altered; "unalterable resolve"; "an unalterable ground rule"

incurable

adjective
1. fatal, terminal, inoperable, irrecoverable, irremediable, remediless He is suffering from an incurable skin disease.
2. incorrigible, hopeless, inveterate, dyed-in-the-wool He's an incurable romantic.

incurable

adjective
Offering no hope or expectation of improvement:
Translations
غَيْر قابِل للشِّفاء، عُضال
nevyléčitelný
uhelbredelig
gyógyíthatatlan
ólæknanlegur
neišgydomas
neārstējamsnedziedināmsnelabojams
nevyliečiteľný
neozdravljiv
tedavi edilemez

incurable

[ɪnˈkjʊərəbl]
A. ADJ
1. (Med) → incurable
2. (fig) [optimist, romantic] → incorregible
B. Nincurable mf

incurable

[ɪnˈkjʊərəbəl] adj
[disease] → incurable
[romantic, optimist] → incurable

incurable

adj, incurably
advunheilbar; (fig)unverbesserlich
n (Med) → unheilbar Kranke(r) mf

incurable

[ɪnˈkjʊərəbl] adj (disease) → incurabile; (habit) → incorreggibile (fig) (optimist) → inguaribile

incurable

(inˈkjuərəbl) adjective
not able to be cured or corrected; not curable. an incurable disease/habit.

in·cur·a·ble

a. incurable, que no tiene cura.

incurable

adj incurable
References in classic literature ?
A KIND-HEARTED Physician sitting at the bedside of a patient afflicted with an incurable and painful disease, heard a noise behind him, and turning saw a cat laughing at the feeble efforts of a wounded mouse to drag itself out of the room.
Schneider frowns ever more and more and shakes his head; he hints that the brain is fatally injured; he does not as yet declare that his patient is incurable, but he allows himself to express the gravest fears.
And it will be clearly shown in the course of this investigation that as far as the principle contended for has prevailed, it has been the cause of incurable disorder and imbecility in the government.
Or again, why blame a lying, thievish Isosceles when you ought rather to deplore the incurable inequality of his sides?
The quarrel with Lanyon was incurable. "I do not blame our old friend," Jekyll wrote, but I share his view that we must never meet.
If your eminence will please to see it, you will find the names of all the incurable diseases we have met with.
The finest composition of human nature, as well as the finest china, may have a flaw in it; and this, I am afraid, in either case, is equally incurable; though, nevertheless, the pattern may remain of the highest value.
That is to say, if a man gets the habit of saying "I should have liked to have known more about it" instead of saying simply and sensibly, "I should have liked to know more about it," that man's disease is incurable. Harris said that his sort of lapse is to be found in every copy of every newspaper that has ever been printed in English, and in almost all of our books.
"Ah, senor!" said the niece, "your worship had better order these to be burned as well as the others; for it would be no wonder if, after being cured of his chivalry disorder, my uncle, by reading these, took a fancy to turn shepherd and range the woods and fields singing and piping; or, what would be still worse, to turn poet, which they say is an incurable and infectious malady."
Because the Romans did in these instances what all prudent princes ought to do, who have to regard not only present troubles, but also future ones, for which they must prepare with every energy, because, when foreseen, it is easy to remedy them; but if you wait until they approach, the medicine is no longer in time because the malady has become incurable; for it happens in this, as the physicians say it happens in hectic fever, that in the beginning of the malady it is easy to cure but difficult to detect, but in the course of time, not having been either detected or treated in the beginning, it becomes easy to detect but difficult to cure.
The wretched being's misery became as incurable and as complete as his deformity.
She had seen the despair of the prisoner, and she knew that it was derived from a double source, and that it was incurable.