indelicate

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Related to indelicacies: blundering

in·del·i·cate

 (ĭn-dĕl′ĭ-kĭt)
adj.
1. Slightly at odds with established standards of propriety; somewhat improper, offensive, or coarse: an indelicate joke. See Synonyms at unseemly.
2. Lacking in consideration for the feelings of others; tactless.

in·del′i·ca·cy (ĭ-kə-sē) n.
in·del′i·cate·ly adv.
in·del′i·cate·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

indelicate

(ɪnˈdɛlɪkɪt)
adj
1. coarse, crude, or rough
2. offensive, embarrassing, or tasteless
inˈdelicacy, inˈdelicateness n
inˈdelicately adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•del•i•cate

(ɪnˈdɛl ɪ kɪt)

adj.
1. rather offensive to propriety or decency; improper: indelicate language.
2. lacking sensitivity; tactless.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.indelicate - in violation of good taste even verging on the indecent; "an indelicate remark"; "an off-color joke"
tasteless - lacking aesthetic or social taste
2.indelicate - lacking propriety and good taste in manners and conduct; "indecorous behavior"
indecent - offensive to good taste especially in sexual matters; "an earthy but not indecent story"; "an indecent gesture"
improper - not suitable or right or appropriate; "slightly improper to dine alone with a married man"; "improper medication"; "improper attire for the golf course"
3.indelicate - verging on the indecent; "an indelicate proposition"
indecent - offensive to good taste especially in sexual matters; "an earthy but not indecent story"; "an indecent gesture"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

indelicate

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

indelicate

adjective
1. Not in keeping with conventional mores:
Idiom: out of line.
3. Lacking sensitivity and skill in dealing with others:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

indelicate

[ɪnˈdelɪkɪt] ADJ (= tactless) → indiscreto, falto de tacto; (= crude) → indelicado
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

indelicate

[ɪnˈdɛlɪkət] adj
(= tactless) → qui manque de tact
to be indelicate to do sth → être indélicat de faire qch
(= not polite) → inconvenant(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

indelicate

adj persontaktlos; act, remark alsoungehörig; subjectpeinlich; (= crude)geschmacklos
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

indelicate

[ɪnˈdɛlɪkɪt] adj (tactless) → indelicato/a, privo/a di tatto; (not polite) → indelicato/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
If I have candidly narrated the importunities, the indelicacies, of which my desire to possess myself of Jeffrey Aspern's papers had rendered me capable I need not shrink from confessing this last indiscretion.
His recent controversies are only the latest in a series of foreign policy indelicacies, in which the billionaire businessman has piled on diplomatic insult after insult.
As often with indelicacies, a respect for the office rather than the temporary officeholder.
This might be a challenging text for some teachers/librarians who express angst about such indelicacies! But boys let it out; girls squeeze their buttocks and squeal 'Yuck!' Here then is a book (and there are many more) that encourages children to 'let it out' and be comfortable with their bodies.
The unwillingness and inability to make distinctions invites a certain coarseness of manners--mobile phone mal-etiquette, public slovenliness and other indelicacies not worth mentioning.