indentured


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Related to indentured: Indentured labor

in·den·ture

 (ĭn-dĕn′chər)
n.
1. often indentures A contract binding one party into the service of another for a specified term.
2.
a. A deed executed by more than one party.
b. An instrument or agreement specifying the terms of a bond or trust.
3. A document separated into portions so as to create indentations that allow the holders of the separate portions to match up in order to confirm authenticity.
tr.v. in·den·tured, in·den·tur·ing, in·den·tures
To bind into the service of another by indenture.

[Middle English endenture, a written agreement, from Anglo-Norman, from endenter, to indent (from the matching notches on multiple copies of the documents); see indent1.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.indentured - bound by contractindentured - bound by contract      
unfree - hampered and not free; not able to act at will
References in classic literature ?
He felt all the more sorry for the girl because misfortune had, in a sense, indentured her to them.
because the world it must recognize as its own is built upon the systematic exploitation and indentured suffering of those without whom it would not exist.
How should one read the blot of 'uselessness' smeared upon indentured Indian women who failed to satisfy the terms specified in the indenture agreement, girmit?
Two hundred years ago, they called them "indentures." In 1831, my great-great-grandfather David Hughson was indentured in New York to a farmer named Hiram Church.
He was a Muslim from the Indonesian island of Alor, who had been indentured in Kupang, West Timor.
Gaiutra Bahadur brings us an elegantly written family history framed by larger tropes of indentured contracts, migratory livelihoods, female subjectivity, colonial violence, memory, and belonging.
Since 1834, following the abolition of slavery in the British Empire, until the end of the World War I, around 1,336,034 indentured Indians were transported to the British colonies in Fiji, Caribbean and South Africa.
In the British Caribbean, that meant indentured servitude, a system which replaced the African slave labor lost to abolition with other nonwhite bodies, usually from Asia, primarily from India.
In 1838, the British and colonized Indian governments permitted sugar planters in British Guiana to bring Indian indentured workers from India to their plantations.
In very readable prose, he focuses on Defoe's use of indentured servitude as an institution and as a complex metaphor to explore the spiritual, moral and economic transformations that Crusoe, Jack, and Moll go through as they move from being slaves of powerful psychological and social forces to masters of themselves and their environments', (p.
The first ship from India carrying indentured labourers to work in the sugar cane plantations that were being developed in Natal arrived in Durban in 1860.