indexical


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in·dex·i·cal

 (ĭn-dĕk′sĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Of or having the function of an index.
2. Linguistics Deictic.
n.
A deictic word or element.

indexical

(ɪnˈdɛksɪkəl)
adj
(Library Science & Bibliography) arranged as or relating to an index or indexes
n
(Linguistics) logic linguistics Also: deictic a term whose reference depends on the context of utterance, such as I, you, here, now, or tomorrow
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.indexical - of or relating to or serving as an index
References in periodicals archive ?
The expressions in the indexical category include pure indexicals, like for instance "I" and "today", and true demonstratives like for instance "you", "he", "that", "there", and "then".
It was at this point that he introduced his baffling notion of 'affirmations', evoking a torrent of criticism from the 'loyal opposition' within the Circle.(4) What emerged in the ensuing discussion was that affirmations, as Schlick conceived them, were characterized by three properties: they contained indexical expressions, they were absolutely incorrigible, and they were indubitable.(5) The question at hand, then, concerns the role of affirmations in relation to protocols in particular, and accepted scientific claims more generally.
Finally, laws of taste may make indexical reference to variable properties of aesthetic respondents (e.g., 'We prefer works which concern characters similar to us; hence men prefer works about men, women about women, and so on'); the existence of such indexical laws would ensure some disagreement in judgements of taste.
The alternative Goldstein proposes is the "atomist indexical sign" (114), which renders objects themselves a part of the process of signification.
Maddalena first attempts a formal analysis: the gesture must be simultaneously iconic, indexical, and symbolic, thereby expressing the three modalities of possibility, specific actuality, and general law, respectively.
Her early projects, in particular, convey morphological and even structural affinities with 1970s indexical strategies.
The former is relative to the meaning of the term/concept I, any expression of self-awareness being based on indexical terms such as "I" or "me"; the latter, on the other hand, refers to the fact that some singular judgments involving the self-ascription of mental (and physical, as will be seen) properties are immune to error through misidentification relative to the first-person pronoun (IEM).
Witness writing can combat these impulses by capturing its readers' attention and redirecting it toward a culture's ghosts and margins, he argues, thus serving a function for an audience that he likens to Charles Sanders Peirce's understanding of indexical signs.
The doodle as ecriture, painting as material mark, both adding indexical value to the artwork.