indie


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in·die

 (ĭn′dē) Informal
n.
1. One, such as a studio or producer, that is unaffiliated with a larger or more commercial organization.
2. An artistic work produced by an independent company or group: "[His film] showed that indies could ... take in millions at the box office" (Liesl Schillinger).
adj.
Of, relating to, or being an indie: an album of indie rock; an indie film company.

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

indie

(ˈɪndɪ)
n
(Pop Music) informal
a. an independent film or record company
b. the genre(s) of film or music produced and released by such a company
c. (as modifier): an indie band; indie film.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•die

(ˈɪn di)
Informal. n.
1. an independently owned business or a self-employed person.
adj.
2. of, pertaining to, or being an indie.
[1940–45; ind (ependent) + -ie]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.indie - a pop group not affiliated with a major record company
pop group - a group that plays pop music
2.indie - an independent film company not associated with an established studio
film company - a company that makes, advertises, and distributes movies
Adj.1.indie - (of pop groups) not affiliated with a major recording company
independent - free from external control and constraint; "an independent mind"; "a series of independent judgments"; "fiercely independent individualism"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

indie

[ˈɪndɪ] ADJ (Brit) (Mus) [music, band] → independiente
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

indie

, indie rock
n (Mus) → Indie m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
He came to me, and told me that some merchants of his acquaintance had been proposing to him to go a voyage for them to the East Indies, and to China, as private traders.
In the chair sits a man of strong and sturdy frame, whose face has been roughened by northern tempests and blackened by the burning sun of the West Indies. He wears an immense periwig, flowing down over his shoulders.
Reported fit for home service for a year or two, and so I was sent off to the West Indies."
Issuing thence to the west and south, as a youth leaves the shelter of his parental house, this spirit found the way to the Indies, discovered the coasts of a new continent, and traversed at last the immensity of the great Pacific, rich in groups of islands remote and mysterious like the constellations of the sky.
The author returns to the Indies, and finds the patriarch of Aethiopia.
As for the great burnings by lightnings, which are often in the West Indies, they are but narrow.
Where banks or sediments have accumulated near to the surface, as in parts of the West Indies, they sometimes become fringed with corals, and hence in some degree resemble lagoon-islands or atolls, in the same manner as fringing-reefs, surrounding gently sloping islands, in some degree resemble barrier-reefs.
The king's letter was written in blue characters upon a rare and precious skin of yellowish colour, and these were the words of it: "The King of the Indies, before whom walk a thousand elephants, who lives in a palace, of which the roof blazes with a hundred thousand rubies, and whose treasure house contains twenty thousand diamond crowns, to the Caliph Haroun al Raschid sends greeting.
If want to know more, I'm nineteen years old, and I come from the West Indies."
'Now look here, father.--Mr Edward has come to England from the West Indies. When he was lost sight of (I ran away on the same day, father), he made a voyage to one of the islands, where a school-friend of his had settled; and, finding him, wasn't too proud to be employed on his estate, and--and in short, got on well, and is prospering, and has come over here on business of his own, and is going back again speedily.
"His name is Mason, sir; and he comes from the West Indies; from Spanish Town, in Jamaica, I think."
Nevertheless, to an active mind like David's, ingenuity is not without its pleasures: it was rather an interesting occupation to become stealthily acquainted with the wards of his mother's simple key (not in the least like Chubb's patent), and to get one that would do its work equally well; and also to arrange a little drama by which he would escape suspicion, and run no risk of forfeiting the prospective hundred at his father's death, which would be convenient in the improbable case of his NOT making a large fortune in the "Indies."