indifferency

in·dif·fer·en·cy

 (ĭn-dĭf′ər-ən-sē, -dĭf′rən-)
n.
Archaic Indifference.

indifferency

(ɪnˈdɪfərənsɪ)
n
impartiality; lack of prejudiceapathy; indifferencelack of difference between two things in importance or characterequivocacy; ambiguitycomplete freedom of choice; absence of constraint (placed on the will) in either direction
References in classic literature ?
In choice of committees; for ripening business for the counsel, it is better to choose indifferent persons, than to make an indifferency, by putting in those, that are strong on both sides.
I carried it on as far as this with a sort of indifferency that he often wondered at, more than at first, but which was the only support of his courtship; and I mention it the rather to intimate again to the ladies that nothing but want of courage for such an indifferency makes our sex so cheap, and prepares them to be ill-used as they are; would they venture the loss of a pretending fop now and then, who carries it high upon the point of his own merit, they would certainly be less slighted, and courted more.
The true life and satisfactions of man seem to elude the utmost rigors or felicities of condition and to establish themselves with great indifferency under all varieties of circumstances.
Thus do all things preach the indifferency of circumstances.
There are objections to every course of life and action, and the practical wisdom infers an indifferency, from the omnipresence of objection.
Locke also takes note of the relationship between sunlight and the quality of the vineyard: "They plant their vineyards both in plains and on hills, with indifferency; but say that on hills, especially opening to the east or south, the wine is best" (Locke 1823, 329).
(5.) In fact, a very similar notion, that of indifferency, does exist in Locke's terminology, but it appears in a different context, attached to the notion of liberty, and does not bear on his own conceptualization of the passions of pain and pleasure in any significant way (see Locke, pp.
He imagined the center of his "nature," his "action & habit," again and again: as a block of marble, a hand, a "zero degree of indifferency." But human contact reacquainted him with his impassive core, which was also his "irritable texture": poverty, dependence, humiliation, degradation, shame, grief, nakedness, bareness.
Or saw, Rather, all that remained when time and fire Had long since done their kindness, and the crime Could nestle, smug and snug, in any Comfortable conscience, such as mine--or the next man's-- And over the black stones the rain Has fallen, falls, with the benign indifferency Of the historical imagination, while grass, In idiot innocence, has fingered all to peace.
The relish of the mind is as various as that of the Body, and like that too may be alter'd; and 'tis a mistake to think, that Men cannot change the displeasingness, or indifferency, that is in actions, into pleasure and desire, if they will do but what is in their power.
He needed the freedom to express his truths "at the zero of indifferency" in order to preserve the truth itself from "folly." (96)
"Time/is nothing to the ivy" in the sense that it is infinitely patient and active, its long-term assault on the wall paralleling the "incessant effort" of the cicadas sawing the tree in "What Day Is" and the "incessant" ascent of the surf in "Paul Valery Stood." Time is nothing to the ivy in another sense, that the ivy is just not in Time's realm, like the sea as defined in "Myth on Mediterranean Beach": "that realm where no Time may subsist." The bikinied hunchback goes into that realm when, "moved by memory in the blood," she "Enters that vast indifferency/ Of perfection that we call the sea," and "lingers there/ [...], somnambulist." She becomes one with the vast indifferency of nature.