indigest

Related to indigest: ingest

indigest

(ˌɪndɪˈdʒɛst)
adj
undigested; disorderly; not yet composed or arranged; immature
n
something indigest; a shapeless or undigested mass
vb
to suffer indigestionto fail to digest (something)
References in classic literature ?
THAT evil influence which carried me first away from my father's house - which hurried me into the wild and indigested notion of raising my fortune, and that impressed those conceits so forcibly upon me as to make me deaf to all good advice, and to the entreaties and even the commands of my father - I say, the same influence, whatever it was, presented the most unfortunate of all enterprises to my view; and I went on board a vessel bound to the coast of Africa; or, as our sailors vulgarly called it, a voyage to Guinea.
His poetry and book reviews have appeared in Verse, Sonora Review, Tarpaulin Sky, InDigest, Drunken Boat, CutBank, iO, Umbrella Factory Magazine, Barrelhouse Magazine, and elsewhere.
Dustin and his wife, Ashleigh Lambert, run the le Poisson Rouge reading series, where I'd read the previous February, as well as maintain the InDigest website.
Volpone, for example, has a "blessed unguento" that can "fortify the most indigest, and crude stomach," while a drop "in your nostrils, likewise, behind the ears" will cure the "vertigine" (2.2.99-102).
Instead, he was told to take an indigest ion medicine, Gaviscon.
WE'VE all now had a few months to digest, or perhaps the word is indigest, the results of the Copenhagen summit.
FREE a blocked sink by crumbling a few Alka-Sel tzer indigest ion tablets in the plug hole and pouring down a cup of white vinegar.
or whether shaLl I say mine eye saith true, and that your Love taught it this alchemy, to mAke of monsters and things indigest such cheRubims as your sweet self resemble, creating every bad a perfect best as fast as objects to his beams assemble?
"'To Set a Form upon that Indigest': Shakespeare's Fictions of History." Comparative Drama 17 (1983): 1-16.
Sonnet 114's illusory metamorphosis of "monsters" and "things indigest" into "cherubins," in a word, its "magic semiotic," is achieved through the semiotic possibilities of the verbally intelligible image: "Through the alembic of his words the poet achieves his function as alchemist.
Or whether shall I say, mine eye saith true, And that your love taught it this alchemy, To make of monsters and things indigest Such cherubins as your sweet self resemble ...