indignation

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in·dig·na·tion

 (ĭn′dĭg-nā′shən)
n.
Anger aroused by something perceived as unjust, mean, or unworthy. See Synonyms at anger.

[Middle English indignacioun, from Old French indignation, from Latin indignātiō, indignātiōn-, from indignātus, past participle of indignārī, to regard as unworthy, from indignus, unworthy; see indign.]

indignation

(ˌɪndɪɡˈneɪʃən) or

indignance

n
anger or scorn aroused by something felt to be unfair, unworthy, or wrong

in•dig•na•tion

(ˌɪn dɪgˈneɪ ʃən)

n.
strong displeasure at something considered unjust, offensive, insulting, or base; righteous anger.
[1325–75; Middle English < Latin]
syn: See anger.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.indignation - a feeling of righteous anger
anger, ire, choler - a strong emotion; a feeling that is oriented toward some real or supposed grievance
dudgeon, high dudgeon - a feeling of intense indignation (now used only in the phrase `in high dudgeon')

indignation

noun resentment, anger, rage, fury, wrath, ire (literary), exasperation, pique, umbrage, righteous anger No wonder he could hardly contain his indignation.

indignation

noun
A strong feeling of displeasure or hostility:
Translations
سُخْط، حَنَق
rozhorlenost
forargelseindignation
närkästys
felháborodásméltatlankodás
gremja, hneykslun
ogorčenje

indignation

[ˌɪndɪgˈneɪʃən] Nindignación f
we expressed our indignation at the demandsexpresamos or mostramos nuestra indignación ante las demandas

indignation

[ˌɪndɪgˈneɪʃən] nindignation f
to be filled with indignation at sth → être empli(e) d'indignation devant qch

indignation

nEntrüstung f (→ at, about, with über +acc), → Unwillen m(at, about wegen); to fill somebody with indignationjdn empören or aufbringen

indignation

[ˌɪndɪgˈneɪʃn] nindignazione f

indignant

(inˈdignənt) adjective
angry, usually because of some wrong that has been done to oneself or others. I feel most indignant at the rude way I've been treated; The indignant customer complained to the manager.
inˈdignantly adverb
`Take your foot off my toe!' she said indignantly.
ˌindigˈnation noun
References in classic literature ?
Those were four miserable months, alternating between intense anxiety, despair, and indignation, pity for him and pity for myself.
Imagine my surprise and indignation when I saw the floor occupied by at least a dozen other lodgers
He moved about in so utterly ridiculous a manner that the Beasts, in a fit of indignation, set upon him with clubs and drove him out of the assembly.
Thereupon the Constituents held an indignation meeting and passed a resolution of tar and feathers.
The boy's father lived in Tercanbury, and there had been much indignation in the city, the local paper had referred to the matter; but Mr.
But Benjamin's virtuous indignation was so very virtuous that it let the spirit of mischief loose in me.
My master, after some expressions of great indignation, wondered "how we dared to venture upon a HOUYHNHNM'S back; for he was sure, that the weakest servant in his house would be able to shake off the strongest YAHOO; or by lying down and rolling on his back, squeeze the brute to death.
A horrid turmoil of mind and body; bursting sobs; broken, vanishing thoughts, now of indignation, now of remorse; broken elementary whiffs of consciousness, of the smell of the horse-hair on the chair bottom, of the jangling of church bells that now began to make day horrible throughout the confines of the city, of the hard floor that bruised his knees, of the taste of tears that found their way into his mouth: for a period of time, the duration of which I cannot guess, while I refuse to dwell longer on its agony, these were the whole of God's world for John Nicholson.
Elizabeth could not see Lady Catherine without recollecting that, had she chosen it, she might by this time have been presented to her as her future niece; nor could she think, without a smile, of what her ladyship's indignation would have been.
There were cooler and more calculating spirits, however, who had the control of affairs, and felt nothing of the patriotic pride and indignation of these youths.
His natural inclination to blame, hitherto kept entirely in abeyance toward his father by the predisposition to think him always right, simply on the ground that he was Tom Tulliver's father, was turned into this new channel by his mother's plaints; and with his indignation against Wakem there began to mingle some indignation of another sort.
In the first p lace, he is aware that the circumstances under which he has married are such as to give me the right of regarding him with a just indignation.