indigo snake

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Related to indigo snakes: Drymarchon corais couperi

indigo snake

n.
Any of several bluish-black nonvenomous snakes of the genus Drymarchon found from the southern United States to northern South America.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

indigo snake

n
(Animals) a dark-blue nonvenomous North American colubrid snake, Drymarchon corais couperi
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in′digo snake′


n.
a large, harmless, shiny blue-black New World snake, Drymarchon corais.
Also called gopher snake.
[1880–85]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.indigo snake - large dark-blue nonvenomous snake that invades burrowsindigo snake - large dark-blue nonvenomous snake that invades burrows; found in southern North America and Mexico
colubrid, colubrid snake - mostly harmless temperate-to-tropical terrestrial or arboreal or aquatic snakes
Drymarchon corais couperi, eastern indigo snake - a variety of indigo snake
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lock's field experience included conservation efforts to protect Campbell's alligator lizards, eastern indigo snakes, Asian turtles and gopher frogs.
NFLT has been focused on preserving land within the O2O corridor, which provides an important habitat for the Florida Black Bear and numerous endangered species including the red-cockaded woodpecker, indigo snakes and gopher tortoises.
Ophiophagy (feeding on snakes) is common in our nation's species of kingsnakes (which include milksnakes) and indigo snakes in the Southeast through the Midwest, into the Southwest.