indisposed

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in·dis·posed

 (ĭn′dĭ-spōzd′)
adj.
1. Mildly ill.
2. Averse; disinclined: was clearly indisposed to grant their request.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

indisposed

(ˌɪndɪˈspəʊzd)
adj
1. sick or ill
2. unwilling
[C15: from Latin indispositus disordered]
indisposition n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•dis•posed

(ˌɪn dɪˈspoʊzd)

adj.
1. sick or ill, esp. slightly.
2. disinclined or unwilling; averse: indisposed to help.
[1375–1425; late Middle English: out of order, not suitable]
in`dis•pos′ed•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.indisposed - somewhat ill or prone to illnessindisposed - somewhat ill or prone to illness; "my poor ailing grandmother"; "feeling a bit indisposed today"; "you look a little peaked"; "feeling poorly"; "a sickly child"; "is unwell and can't come to work"
ill, sick - affected by an impairment of normal physical or mental function; "ill from the monotony of his suffering"
2.indisposed - (usually followed by `to') strongly opposedindisposed - (usually followed by `to') strongly opposed; "antipathetic to new ideas"; "averse to taking risks"; "loath to go on such short notice"; "clearly indisposed to grant their request"
disinclined - unwilling because of mild dislike or disapproval; "disinclined to say anything to anybody"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

indisposed

adjective
1. ill, poorly (informal), sick, crook (Austral. & N.Z. informal), ailing, unwell, laid up (informal), under the weather, confined to bed, on the sick list (informal) The speaker was regrettably indisposed.
ill well, sound, fit, healthy, fine, hardy
2. unwilling, reluctant, loath, disinclined, averse He seemed indisposed to chat.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

indisposed

adjective
1. Affected or tending to be affected with minor health problems:
2. Not inclined or willing to do or undertake:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
مُتَوَعِّك، مُنْحَرِف الصِّحَّه
indisponovaný
indisponeretutilpas
lasinn
negaluojantis
nevesels
indisponovaný
keyifsizrahatsız

indisposed

[ˌɪndɪsˈpəʊzd] ADJ (= ill) → indispuesto; (= disinclined) → poco dispuesto (to do sth a hacer algo)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

indisposed

[ˌɪndɪˈspəʊzd] adj (= unwell) → indisposé(e), souffrant(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

indisposed

adj
(= unwell)unwohl, indisponiert (geh), → unpässlich (geh)
(= disinclined) to be indisposed to do somethingnicht gewillt or geneigt sein, etw zu tun
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

indisposed

[ˌɪndɪsˈpəʊzd] adj (frm)
a. (unwell) → indisposto/a
b. (unwilling) → poco incline
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

indisposed

(indiˈspəuzd) adjective
(slightly) ill. The princess is indisposed and has cancelled her engagements.
ˈinˌdispoˈsition noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

indisposed

a. maldispuesto-a; indispuesto-a;
v.
to become ___enfermarse.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
Pickwick, with sundry blushes, produced the following little tale, as having been 'edited' by himself, during his recent indisposition, from his notes of Mr.
Doth any man doubt, that if there were taken out of men's minds, vain opinions, flattering hopes, false valuations, imaginations as one would, and the like, but it would leave the minds, of a number of men, poor shrunken things, full of melancholy and indisposition, and unpleasing to themselves?
With the instinct of the true cavalryman and a particular indisposition to the discharge of firearms, he drew his saber.
In one line by itself was an announcement of the first night of a new melodrama; in another line by itself was an announcement of the last six nights of an old one; a third line was devoted to the re-engagement of the unrivalled African Knife- swallower, who had kindly suffered himself to be prevailed upon to forego his country engagements for one week longer; a fourth line announced that Mr Snittle Timberry, having recovered from his late severe indisposition, would have the honour of appearing that evening; a fifth line said that there were 'Cheers, Tears, and Laughter!' every night; a sixth, that that was positively the last appearance of Mr Vincent Crummles of Provincial Celebrity.
Nothing but real indisposition could occasion this extraordinary delay.
He felt a curious indisposition to speak, a queer sort of desire to wait on the chance of hearing more.