individual self-defense

individual self-defense

The individual's inherent right of self-defense is an element of unit self-defense. It is critical that individuals are aware of and train to the principle that they have the authority to use all available means and to take all appropriate action to defend themselves and other US personnel in their vicinity. In the implementation of these standing and other rules of engagement (ROE), commanders have the obligation to ensure that the individuals within that commander's unit understand when and how they may use force in self-defense. While individuals assigned to a unit respond to a hostile act or hostile intent in the exercise of self-defense, their use of force must remain consistent with lawful orders of their superiors, the rules contained in joint doctrine, and other applicable ROE promulgated for the mission or area of responsibility.
References in periodicals archive ?
Its Article 2(4) requires member states to refrain "from the threat or use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of any state, or in any other manner inconsistent with the Purposes of the United Nations." The charter's only specific exceptions to this broad prohibition are when a state acts in "collective or individual self-defense" (Article 51) or when the Security Council authorizes states to use force in order to "maintain or restore international peace and security" (Article 42).
And he knows that "reliance on a permanent private market for firearms guaranteed most militiamen, through their own efforts, could always obtain firearms suitable for both collective and individual self-defense, and forestalled tyranny by precluding rogue public officials from monopolizing the production, distribution, and possession of firearms."
The best point of comparison, however, is found in the church's stance on war--its positions on collective self-defense (as opposed to the individual self-defense that gun violence generally implicates).
(56) If the original meaning of the Second Amendment was to protect individual self-defense, the manner in which the amendment expresses that protection--by reference to a thing used for self-defense--is an odd way to do it.
National self-defense is individual self-defense writ large.
Offered more for illustration than recommendation, the following could serve as a baseline rule of individual self-defense, which could be built on and adjusted to expand the scope of protective authority consistent with the threat environment and mission-accomplishment considerations: Individual Self-Defense and Defense of Others--You are authorized to use force, up to and including deadly force, when strictly necessary to defend yourself or members of your unit [or specify others] in the immediate vicinity against a violent act or imminent threat of a violent act likely to cause death or grievous bodily harm.
The Framers believed individual self-defense was an inalienable natural right." Id.
It is the inherent right of individual self-defense. The International Committee of the Red Cross, in its Interpretive Guidance on the Notion of Direct Participation in Hostilities specifically excludes individual self-defense and defense of others against unlawful violence as meeting the threshold for direct participation in hostilities.
One question remains to be addressed: is the concept of unit self-defense simply military jargon for a right of individual self-defense also recognized by international law?
individual self-defense is 'the central component' of the
In its decision, the Court correctly concluded that "individual self-defense is 'the central component" of the Second Amendment right" to keep and bear arms.
More important, individual self-defense is a fundamental right from an American perspective, deeply rooted in the nation's history and tradition.
Full browser ?