individuation


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in·di·vid·u·a·tion

 (ĭn′də-vĭj′o͞o-ā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of individuating, especially the process by which social individuals become differentiated one from the other.
2. The condition of being individuated; individuality.
3. Philosophy
a. The development of the individual from the general or universal.
b. The distinction or determination of the individual within the general or universal.
4. In Jungian psychology, the gradual integration and unification of the self through the resolution of successive layers of psychological conflict.
5. Embryology Formation of distinct organs or structures through the interaction of adjacent tissues.

individuation

(ˌɪndɪˌvɪdjʊˈeɪʃən)
n
1. the act or process of individuating
2. (Psychology) (in the psychology of Jung) the process by which the wholeness of the individual is established through the integration of consciousness and the collective unconscious
3. (Zoology) zoology the development of separate but mutually interdependent units, as in the development of zooids forming a colony

in•di•vid•u•a•tion

(ˌɪn dəˌvɪdʒ uˈeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act of individuating.
2. the state of being individuated; individual existence; individuality.
3. Philos. the development of the individual from the general.
[1620–30]

individuation

the act or process of becoming an individual or distinct entity.
See also: Self
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.individuation - discriminating the individual from the generic group or species
discrimination, secernment - the cognitive process whereby two or more stimuli are distinguished
2.individuation - the quality of being individual; "so absorbed by the movement that she lost all sense of individuality"
trait - a distinguishing feature of your personal nature
singularity, uniqueness - the quality of being one of a kind; "that singularity distinguished him from all his companions"
References in periodicals archive ?
In part 2, we meet object projectivism itself, which holds that nothing in the world-not properties, not relations, not brute facts--grounds the individuation of objects.
He introduced the concepts of extraversion and introversion, and terms such as complex, archetype, individuation, and the collective unconscious.
Among his topics are Yves Bonnefoy, </La Grande Ourse/>: voice, consciousness, presence, naming; Venus Khoury-Ghata, </Le Libre des Suppliques/>: hauntedness, vigilance, fable, circularity; Tahar Ben Jelloun, </Que la Blessure se Ferme/>: light, love, passion, paradox; Marie-Claire Bancquart, </Trace du Vivant/>: primordiality, rites, question, rebirth; and Jacques Dupin, </Le Gresil: </Ubac/> and </Abret/>, individuation and pleroma.
Holistic projections are another way of describing the final stage of self-actualization, also known as individuation in Jungian psychology.
I would say that whereas in Simondon's ontogenetic model transindivuality concerns the individuation of all living beings, condividuality lays the emphasis on the composition of that which is singular and divisible.
Keywords: Individuation; Self; Jung; Coleridge; "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner"
Technics and Time leans heavily on Simondon from the outset and his ideas around individuation are at the centre of Stiegler's critique of hyperindustrial society.
Schiwy; "Shame, Secrecy, and Silence: The Tangled Roots of Childhood and the Suppression of Voice," by Joyce Brady; "In the Absence of a Mother Tongue," by Charlene Spretnak; "Speech Defector: A Child Stutterer Finds Her Voice," by Carolyn Butcher; "The Fat Lady Sings," by Cheryl Fuller; "Sleeping Beauty Wakes Up: Breaking the Spell of Women's Silence," by Janice Gary; "Flying by Words--From the Front Porch to the Podium: Educational Individuation and Creative Endurance," by Geraldine Cannon Becker; "A Legacy of Silence: Transforming the Silence of Absence to a Silence of Presence," by Marilyn L.
In ' The Unbearable Closeness of Being', the artists tackle notions of identity, individuation, otherness and marginality.
In addition, they provide activities for growth and individuation by bringing in speakers for lectures and workshops.
Drawing on Kristeva's theory of abjection, she argues that, in a white culture than denies him belonging, Bigger Thomas's conflicting desires for individuation and integration lead to both his drive for solidarity and his tragic impulse for violence.

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