indolency

indolency

(ˈɪndələnsɪ)
n
indolence
References in periodicals archive ?
By "civil interests," he intended "Life, Liberty, Health and Indolency of Body; and the possession of outward things, such as Money, Lands, Houses, Furniture, and the like," or what we today call property It is the ruler's duty, "by the impartial Execution of equal Laws," to secure "the just Possession of these things belonging to this life.
The magistrate, Locke argued, should manifest no concern for speculative doctrines, since they do not pertain to the civil interests of "life, liberty, health and indolency of body; and the possession of outward things, such as money, lands, houses, furniture and the like.
Civil interests I call life, liberty, health, and indolency of body; and the possession of outward things, such as money, lands, houses, furniture, and the like" (1983, 15; emphasis original).