inductive

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in·duc·tive

 (ĭn-dŭk′tĭv)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or using logical induction: inductive reasoning.
2. Electricity Of or arising from inductance: inductive reactance.
3. Causing or influencing; inducing.
4. Introductory.

in·duc′tive·ly adv.
in·duc′tive·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

inductive

(ɪnˈdʌktɪv)
adj
1. (General Physics) relating to, involving, or operated by electrical or magnetic induction: an inductive reactance.
2. (Logic) logic maths of, relating to, or using induction: inductive reasoning.
3. serving to induce or cause
4. a rare word for introductory
5. (Biology) biology producing a reaction within an organism, esp induction in embryonic tissue
inˈductively adv
inˈductiveness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•duc•tive

(ɪnˈdʌk tɪv)

adj.
1. of, pertaining to, or involving electrical or magnetic induction.
2. operating by induction: an inductive machine.
3. of, pertaining to, or employing logical induction.
4. capable of bringing about embryonic induction.
5. serving to induce; leading or influencing.
6. introductory.
[1600–10; < Late Latin]
in•duc′tive•ly, adv.
in•duc′tive•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.inductive - arising from inductance; "inductive reactance"
electricity - a physical phenomenon associated with stationary or moving electrons and protons
2.inductive - of reasoning; proceeding from particular facts to a general conclusion; "inductive reasoning"
logic - the branch of philosophy that analyzes inference
synthetical, synthetic - of a proposition whose truth value is determined by observation or facts; "`all men are arrogant' is a synthetic proposition"
a posteriori - involving reasoning from facts or particulars to general principles or from effects to causes; "a posteriori demonstration"
deductive - involving inferences from general principles
3.inductive - inducing or influencing; leading on; "inductive to the sin of Eve"- John Milton
causative - producing an effect; "poverty as a causative factor in crime"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

inductive

adjective
Before or in preparation for the main matter, action, or business:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

inductive

[ɪnˈdʌktɪv] ADJ [reasoning] → inductivo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

inductive

adj, inductively
advinduktiv
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

inductive

[ɪnˈdʌktɪv] adjinduttivo/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the indecisiveness scale (Germeijs and de Boeck, 2003) is a valid and reliable measure by all sides but it is developed in distinct cultural context that may result certain culture related problems and linguistic hurdles to understand and measure inductiveness. These issues can be addressed by developing indecisiveness scale in Pakistani culture because there is not even a single measure exists to measure the problem of indecisiveness in Pakistani population.
Additionally, the inductiveness of grounded theory allowed for major areas of influence to emerge, in addition to the unique concepts, experiences, and relationships that may be overlooked by more predetermined research methods.
Claus Oetke ("The Role of the Example in Ancient Indian Logic") and Tom Tillemans ("Inductiveness, Deductiveness and Examples in Buddhist Logic") both advance broadly philosophical exercises in "rational reconstruction"--or as Oetke puts it, in a concluding brief for this kind of approach, "teleological" (as against "historical") elaboration (pp.

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