indulgency

indulgency

(ɪnˈdʌldʒənsɪ)
n, pl -cies
indulgence
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Bulging tummies in men are usually caused by a sedentary life style coupled with an over indulgency that is characterised by excessive intake of food and alcohol as well as lack of exercises.
"Our customers want the indulgency and the experience, but not everyone has 30 or 40 bucks to spend on a cake," Caudill says.
According to Hofstede (2001), Brazilian culture is more individualistic and has higher masculinity, long-term orientation, and indulgency than Portuguese culture.
Brisbourne has his team in cracking form, saddling eight winners in the last 14 days and Royal Indulgency, who was following up on a cosy success at Chepstow on Monday, is considered capable of going in again next week.
In fact Webb and Palmer (1998) and Elger and Smith (1998), researching Japanese firms in the same British regional labour market, found resistance partially functional for production, as part of the 'indulgency pattern' of social relations within work, as identified by Gouldner (1955).
In either case the evidence confirms Purcell's (1993) suggestion that HRM "makes more demands on employees, work is intensified, there is less room for managerial slack and for indulgency patterns".