inebriated

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in·e·bri·at·ed

 (ĭn-ē′brē-ā′tĭd)
adj.
Intoxicated with alcohol; drunk: The inebriated partygoers were very loud.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.inebriated - stupefied or excited by a chemical substance (especially alcohol); "a noisy crowd of intoxicated sailors"; "helplessly inebriated"

inebriated

adjective drunk, wasted (slang), tight (informal), smashed (slang), canned (slang), high (informal), flying (slang), bombed (slang), stoned (slang), hammered (slang), steaming (slang), wrecked (slang), out of it (slang), plastered (slang), blitzed (slang), pissed (Brit., Austral., & N.Z. slang), lit up (slang), merry (Brit. informal), bladdered (slang), under the influence (informal), intoxicated, tipsy, befuddled, legless (informal), under the weather (informal), paralytic (informal), sozzled (informal), steamboats (Scot. slang), off your face (slang), half-cut (informal), blind drunk, high as a kite (informal), zonked (slang), blotto (slang), the worse for drink, inebriate, out to it (Austral. & N.Z. slang), drunk as a skunk, bacchic, in your cups, rat-arsed (taboo slang), Brahms and Liszt (slang), half seas over (informal), bevvied (dialect), three sheets in the wind (informal), babalas (S. African), fou or fu' (Scot.), pie-eyed (slang) He was obviously inebriated by the time dessert was served.

inebriated

adjective
Stupefied, excited, or muddled with alcoholic liquor:
Informal: cockeyed, stewed.
Idioms: drunk as a skunk, half-seas over, high as a kite, in one's cups, three sheets in the wind.
Translations
مست
päihtynyt
ebrius

inebriated

[ɪˈniːbrɪeɪtɪd] ADJ (frm) → ebrio

inebriated

[ɪnˈiːbrieɪtɪd] adjivre

inebriated

adj
(form)betrunken, unter Alkoholeinfluss (form)
(fig)berauscht, trunken (liter)

inebriated

[ɪˈniːbrɪˌeɪtɪd] adj (frm) → ubriaco/a
References in periodicals archive ?
The late Henri, whom bar room legend has it crawled across the Philharmonic pub floor to inebriatedly kiss Ginsberg's feet in homage, recalled in the book The Liverpool Scene, edited by Edward Lucie-Smith: "He had a fantastic effect on Liverpool.
Moving into her own place, Sam gets inebriatedly busy with a hunksome neighbor (Billy Ray Gallion).