ineducable

in·ed·u·ca·ble

 (ĭn-ĕj′ə-kə-bəl)
adj.
Incapable of being educated.

in·ed′u·ca·bil′i·ty n.

ineducable

(ɪnˈɛdjʊkəbəl)
adj
incapable of being educated, esp on account of mental retardation
inˌeducaˈbility n

in•ed•u•ca•ble

(ɪnˈɛdʒ ʊ kə bəl)

adj.
incapable of being educated, esp. because of some condition, as mental retardation or emotional disturbance.
[1880–85]
in•ed`u•ca•bil′i•ty, n.
Translations

ineducable

[ɪnˈedjʊkəbl] ADJineducable

ineducable

adjbildungsunfähig
References in periodicals archive ?
To the imperial government of far-distant Beijing and their agents on the ground, the Zhongjia were one of a cluster of peoples who lacked "order." The challenge perceived by imperial officials was to "advance the Zhongjia toward civilization," yet they were "stupid by nature" and thus ineducable (65, 130, 78).
And so, a woman diagnosed as ineducable later has her decisions described as genius by a New York Times art critic.
El libro de Wells, resena Borges, "corre el albur de parecer, a primera vista, una mera enciclopedia de injurias" (Otras inquisiciones 153) y sus notas recopilan algunas de las mas destacadas: "la ineducable estupidez" de los lideres ingleses, "esa viuda quintaesenciar Anthony Eden, la abundancia de "hombres razonables" que prefieren la mediocridad a la ambicion, etc (Rosato y Alvarez 349-50).
Writing in Forbes in 2011, Peter Ferrara, one of the strongest advocates for Social Security privatization, argued that the proposal failed because "Bush's White House staff in charge of the Social Security reform effort never understood the politics or policy of personal accounts, and proved ineducable on the subject." On the other side of the issue, William Galston, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, argued in 2007 that "President Bush overestimated the amount of political capital he had banked."
In 1816, no schools for deaf students existed in the United States, and people commonly perceived "the deaf and dumb" as ineducable. Many deaf individuals lived scattered, largely isolated from each other, and illiterate.
For decades, states closed public schoolhouse doors to thousands of children whose physical or emotional disabilities led authorities to label them "ineducable." In 1985, Justice Thurgood Marshall wrote that in public education and other areas of American life, children and adults with mental disabilities had been "subject to a 'lengthy and tragic history' of segregation and discrimination that can only be called grotesque." (94) He explained:
Simon, who was seven years old, would rock continually and was considered ineducable. His reaction when he was lifted on to an elderly pony in the field and his fingers touched the pony's hair was a joy to see.
Fisher remarked on the "cynical faces and ineducable minds of some of our students"--students whom he and Wolfe regularly faced.