ineradicable

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in·e·rad·i·ca·ble

 (ĭn′ĭ-răd′ĭ-kə-bəl)
adj.
Incapable of being eradicated.

in′e·rad′i·ca·bil′i·ty n.
in′e·rad′i·ca·bly adv.

ineradicable

(ˌɪnɪˈrædɪkəbəl)
adj
not able to be removed or rooted out; inextirpable: an ineradicable disease.
ˌineˈradicableness, ˌineradicaˈbility n
ˌineˈradicably adv

in•e•rad•i•ca•ble

(ˌɪn ɪˈræd ɪ kə bəl)

adj.
not eradicable; not capable of being eradicated.
[1810–20]
in`e•rad′i•ca•ble•ness, n.
in`e•rad′i•ca•bly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.ineradicable - not able to be destroyed or rooted out; "ineradicable superstitions"
lasting, permanent - continuing or enduring without marked change in status or condition or place; "permanent secretary to the president"; "permanent address"; "literature of permanent value"
eradicable - able to be eradicated or rooted out

ineradicable

adjective
Translations

ineradicable

[ˌɪnɪˈrædɪkəbl] ADJ [prejudice, hatred] → imposible de erradicar; [differences] → insalvables

ineradicable

[ˌɪniˈrædɪkəbəl] adj [quality, fact] → indéracinable, tenace

ineradicable

adj mistake, failingunabänderlich, unwiderruflich; feeling of guilt, hatredtief sitzend, unauslöschlich; disease, prejudiceunausrottbar

ineradicable

[ˌɪnɪˈrædɪkəbl] adj (frm) (feeling) → tenace; (sign, memory) → incancellabile
References in periodicals archive ?
Accepting the principle of ineradicability of wrong does not disable ethics by consigning Eliot's characters to depravity.
For more on the ineradicability of the racialization of tribes, see Krakoff, supra note 15, at 312-13, which describes how racialization of the Seminole served goals of settling Florida and preventing the settlement of American Indians in the newly acquired territory; and Krakoff, supra note 14, at 1065-75, which describes how inferiority was stitched into the early cases defining tribes.
Grounding her theory on the assumption of antagonism's ineradicability, Mouffe redefines democratic politics as agonistic pluralism.
Throughout the 560s, Japan's national and counternational cinemas, both on either side bound together by the ineradicability of the concept of the nation, maintained the rhetoric of national cinemas and its integrity as a category designed to render visible and validate certain films.
His theory of the "third sex," his conviction that homosexuals were born, not made, led him to believe in the "ineradicability" (Unausrottbarkeit) of homosexuality; criminal penalties could not eliminate what nature had created.
considers two different defenses of poetry--an ineradicability defense
RIKER, LIBERALISM AGAINST POPULISM: A CONFRONTATION BETWEEN THE THEORY OF DEMOCRACY AND THE THEORY OF SOCIAL CHOICE 167 (1982) (highlighting the ineradicability of strategic voting in all voting systems).
The rejection of the exteriority of power implies the futile and ultimately disabling character of drawing up schemes of a "final emancipation" from power relations by identifying them as externally positioned obstacles: "The thought that there could be a state of communication which could be such that the games of truth would circulate freely, without obstacles, without constraint and without coercive effects, seems to me to be Utopia." (97) Thus, political criticism might rather reaffirm the irreducibility and ineradicability of power relations, all the while insisting on their ultimately unfounded and foundational character: "yes, there is always power; and yes, its exercise is always contingent and decisionist." (98)
Postmodernism is a formula for amnesia about its own sources, an anodyne against the pain of deep reflection on the ineradicability of injustice.
He thus begins (4) the Counter-Enlightenment's great effort to show that far from being what it itself claimed to be--namely, the clear-sighted attempt to cast the light of human reason into all the dark corners of the world--the Enlightenment was and is willfully oblivious to the ineradicability of darkness and mystery at the basis of human existence.