inertia

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in·er·tia

 (ĭ-nûr′shə)
n.
1. Physics The tendency of a body at rest to remain at rest or of a body in straight line motion to stay in motion in a straight line unless acted on by an outside force; the resistance of a body to changes in momentum.
2. Resistance or disinclination to motion, action, or change: an entrenched bureaucracy's inertia.

[Latin, idleness, from iners, inert-, inert; see inert.]

in·er′tial adj.
in·er′tial·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

inertia

(ɪnˈɜːʃə; -ʃɪə)
n
1. the state of being inert; disinclination to move or act
2. (General Physics) physics
a. the tendency of a body to preserve its state of rest or uniform motion unless acted upon by an external force
b. an analogous property of other physical quantities that resist change: thermal inertia.
inˈertial adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•er•tia

(ɪnˈɜr ʃə, ɪˈnɜr-)

n.
1. inertness, esp. with regard to effort, motion, action, and the like; inactivity; sluggishness.
2.
a. the property of matter by which it retains its state of rest or its velocity along a straight line so long as it is not acted upon by an external force.
b. an analogous property of a force: electric inertia.
[1705–15; < Latin: lack of skill, slothfulness. See inert, -ia]
in•er′tial, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·er·tia

(ĭ-nûr′shə)
The tendency of a body at rest to remain at rest, or of a body in motion to continue moving in a straight line at a constant speed unless a force is applied to it. Mass is a measure of a body's inertia.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

inertia

A body’s tendency to maintain a state of rest or of uniform motion.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inertia - a disposition to remain inactive or inert; "he had to overcome his inertia and get back to work"
trait - a distinguishing feature of your personal nature
languor, lethargy, phlegm, sluggishness, flatness - inactivity; showing an unusual lack of energy; "the general appearance of sluggishness alarmed his friends"
restfulness - the attribute of being restful; "he longed for the restfulness of home"
passivity, passiveness - the trait of remaining inactive; a lack of initiative
indolence, laziness - inactivity resulting from a dislike of work
2.inertia - (physics) the tendency of a body to maintain its state of rest or uniform motion unless acted upon by an external force
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
moment of inertia - the tendency of a body to resist angular acceleration
mechanical phenomenon - a physical phenomenon associated with the equilibrium or motion of objects
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

inertia

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
فُتور، خُمول، جُمود
ochablostsetrvačnost
inertitræghed
hitausinertia
aîgerîaleysi; sljóleiki
daadloosheidinertietraagheid
bezvládnosť
tröghet
eylemsizliktembellik

inertia

[ɪˈnɜːʃə] N
1. [of person] → inercia f, apatía f
2. (Chem, Phys) → inercia f
see also moment 2
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

inertia

[ɪnˈɜːrʃə] ninertie finertia-reel seat belt nceinture f de sécurité à enrouleur
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

inertia

n (lit, fig)Trägheit f; inertia-reel seat beltAutomatikgurt m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

inertia

[ɪˈnɜːʃə] ninerzia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

inert

(iˈnəːt) adjective
1. without the power to move. A stone is an inert object.
2. (of people) not wanting to move, act or think. lazy, inert people.
iˈnertness noun
iˈnertia (-ʃiə) noun
the state of being inert. It was difficult to overcome the feeling of inertia that the wine and heat had brought on.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

in·er·ti·a

n. inercia, falta de actividad; letargia, abulia, resistencia a un cambio.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The main parameters of a hydropower station are as follows: rated head [H.sub.r] = 216 m, rated speed [n.sub.r] = 150 r/min, rated flow [Q.sub.r] = 360.3 [m.sup.3]/s, rated power [P.sub.r] = 714 MW, the maximum of the opening [a.sub.max] = 28.5 mm (model), head loss coefficients are 0.0098 and 8.402 x [10.sup.-4], and their water flow inertia time constants are 1.3 s and 0.65 s, respectively.
Wind turbines do provide some stored kinetic energy, but they generally have lower inertia time constants than the large generators of old.
The method defines TGM rotor's rotation inertia time constant T as the main and the only parameter which characterizes TGM behaviour in pulsing flow.