inexactness


Also found in: Thesaurus.

in·ex·act

 (ĭn′ĭg-zăkt′)
adj.
1. Not strictly accurate or precise; not exact: an inexact quotation; an inexact description of what had taken place.
2. Not rigorous or meticulous: an inexact mind; an inexact method.

in′ex·act′ly adv.
in′ex·act′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inexactness - the quality of being inaccurate and having errors
inaccuracy - the quality of being inaccurate and having errors
impreciseness, imprecision - the quality of lacking precision
exactitude, exactness - the quality of being exact; "he demanded exactness in all details"; "a man of great exactitude"
Translations
nepřesnost
unøjagtighed
ónákvæmni

inexact

(inigˈzӕkt) adjective
not quite correct, exact or true. an inexact description.
ˌinexˈactness noun
References in classic literature ?
Passepartout, who had conscientiously studied the programme of his duties, was more than surprised to see his master guilty of the inexactness of appearing at this unaccustomed hour; for, according to rule, he was not due in Saville Row until precisely midnight.
Repetition may be bad, but surely inexactness is worse.
It strives not for symmetrical, corrective justice, but mass blame-signaling effect, which means that the inexactness with which litigation seeks to hold Big Pharma stakeholders accountable is a desired feature, rather than a bug.
For practical purposes, we might want to introduce two thresholds [t.sub.s] (strong interaction threshold) and [t.sub.w] (weak interaction threshold) such that [t.sub.s] - [t.sub.w] is a positive "safety margin" accounting for the inexactness of the scoring function from the previous step.
But adopt a metaphor to explain something complicated, and the inexactness of the comparison means you must be lying.
Aesthetically, it was pleasing in its inexactness, rambling and irregular lines, its woodiness.
We can overcome the vagueness by fixing the percentage of membership namely the percentage of membership enables us to find out the level of inexactness. This theory is known as fuzzy theory.
The human mind easily reason in an uncertain, in exact way and this manner of reasoning cannot be expressed precisely not even with statistical or probability methods but fuzzy efficiently maps out this uncertainty and inexactness.
Included are hedges (allegedly, perhaps, might), statements of inexactness (almost, approximate, vague, somewhere), and confusion (baffled, puzzling, hesitate).
Ambiguity is defined as a situation of inexactness, and is synonymous with the feelings of uncertainty and ambivalence.
Others, however, accept the inexactness of the term but hold the opinion that it remains an operative one for defining a key process in the Iberian Peninsula in medieval times (Garcia-Fitz, 2010).
Because of this internal tension, these individuals might push others to get things done and be critical of inexactness.