inexpedient


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Related to inexpedient: estimable, indispensable

in·ex·pe·di·ent

 (ĭn′ĭk-spē′dē-ənt)
adj.
Not expedient; inadvisable: an inexpedient tactic.

in′ex·pe′di·ence, in′ex·pe′di·en·cy n.
in′ex·pe′di·ent·ly adv.

inexpedient

(ˌɪnɪkˈspiːdɪənt)
adj
not suitable, advisable, or judicious
ˌinexˈpedience, ˌinexˈpediency n
ˌinexˈpediently adv

in•ex•pe•di•ent

(ˌɪn ɪkˈspi di ənt)

adj.
not expedient; not suitable, judicious, or advisable.
[1600–10]
in`ex•pe′di•ence, in`ex•pe′di•en•cy, n.
in`ex•pe′di•ent•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.inexpedient - not suitable or advisable; "an inexpedient tactic"
disadvantageous - constituting a disadvantage
impolitic - not politic; "an impolitic approach to a sensitive issue"
expedient - serving to promote your interest; "was merciful only when mercy was expedient"
2.inexpedient - not appropriate to the purposeinexpedient - not appropriate to the purpose  
impolitic - not politic; "an impolitic approach to a sensitive issue"
Translations

inexpedient

[ˌɪnɪksˈpiːdɪənt] ADJinoportuno, inconveniente, imprudente

inexpedient

adj plan, measures, action, decisionungeeignet, unzweckmäßig; policyunratsam, unklug; it would be inexpedient to do thates wäre unklug, das zu tun
References in classic literature ?
It is, indeed, possible that a tax might be laid on a particular article by a State which might render it INEXPEDIENT that thus a further tax should be laid on the same article by the Union; but it would not imply a constitutional inability to impose a further tax.
In the constitution of the judiciary department in particular, it might be inexpedient to insist rigorously on the principle: first, because peculiar qualifications being essential in the members, the primary consideration ought to be to select that mode of choice which best secures these qualifications; secondly, because the permanent tenure by which the appointments are held in that department, must soon destroy all sense of dependence on the authority conferring them.
Whether or no the early loves of Adam and Martha had rendered it inexpedient that they should now preside together over a Shaker village, it was certainly most singular that such should be the final result of many warm and tender hopes.
Inexpedient. Whatever in the long run and with regard to the greater number of instances men find to be generally inexpedient comes to be considered wrong, wicked, immoral.
She even went so far as to murmur that they were non-essentials and that my trip after them might be inexpedient. And as she had followed the trend of my silence, she now followed the trend of my speech, and she knew that I was going aboard, not because of condensed milk and marmalade, but because of her and of her anxiety, which she knew she had failed to hide.
"I found or devised something for you three weeks ago; but as you seemed both useful and happy here--as my sisters had evidently become attached to you, and your society gave them unusual pleasure- -I deemed it inexpedient to break in on your mutual comfort till their approaching departure from Marsh End should render yours necessary."
“We have certainly heard bad news,” returned Elizabeth, “ and it may be necessary that my father should leave home for a short period; unless I can persuade him to trust my cousin Richard with the business, whose absence from the country, just at this time, too, might be inexpedient.”
He knew much less - the Chief Inspector was positive - than certain other individuals he had in his mind, but whose arrest seemed to him inexpedient, besides being a more complicated matter, on account of the rules of the game.
'It was said once to me that it is inexpedient to write the names of strangers concerned in any matter, because by the naming of names many good plans are brought to confusion.'
Government is at best but an expedient; but most governments are usually, and all governments are sometimes, inexpedient. The objections which have been brought against a standing army, and they are many and weighty, and deserve to prevail, may also at last be brought against a standing government.
In the leading English case, Motorola Credit Corporation v Uzan (No.2) at [147] , Potter LJ set out five particular considerations for the court to have in mind in considering whether it is inexpedient to make a worldwide freezing order in aid of foreign proceedings.
substantially changed, and the execution of the procurement has become impossible or inexpedient.