inexpressible

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in·ex·press·i·ble

 (ĭn′ĭk-sprĕs′ə-bəl)
adj.
Impossible to express: inexpressible grief.

in′ex·press′i·bil′i·ty n.
in′ex·press′i·bly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

inexpressible

(ˌɪnɪkˈsprɛsəbəl)
adj
too great, etc, to be expressed or uttered; indescribable
ˌinexˌpressiˈbility, ˌinexˈpressibleness n
ˌinexˈpressibly adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•ex•press•i•ble

(ˌɪn ɪkˈsprɛs ə bəl)

adj.
not expressible; incapable of being uttered or described in words.
[1615–25]
in`ex•press`i•bil′i•ty, in`ex•press′i•ble•ness, n.
in`ex•press′i•bly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.inexpressible - defying expressioninexpressible - defying expression      
expressible - capable of being expressed; "an expressible emotion"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

inexpressible

adjective indescribable, unspeakable, indefinable, ineffable, unutterable, incommunicable He felt a sudden inexpressible loneliness.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

inexpressible

adjective
That cannot be described:
Idioms: beyond description, defying description.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
لا يُعَبَّر عَنه ، يَفوق الوَصْف
nepopsatelnýnevýslovný
ubeskrivelig
ólÿsanlegur
neapsakomai
neaprakstāmsneizsakāms
anlatılamaz

inexpressible

[ˌɪnɪksˈpresəbl] ADJ [feelings, thoughts] → inexpresable; [joy, beauty, sorrow] → inefable, indescriptible
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

inexpressible

[ˌɪnɪkˈsprɛsɪbəl] adj [feeling] → inexprimable
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

inexpressible

adj thoughts, feelingsunbeschreiblich, unbeschreibbar; pain, joy alsounsagbar
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

inexpressible

[ˌɪnɪksˈprɛsəbl] adjinesprimibile
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

inexpressible

(inikˈspresəbl) adjective
that cannot be expressed or described. inexpressible delight.
ˌinexˈpressibly adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
The purusarthas as well fall into this realm of inexpressibility, and it may be in this way that the Sanskrit drama conveys its extrinsic message: i.e., by equating or collapsing purusartha and rasa.
Clodagh Brook's dense study "The Montalian Object and Inexpressibility" offers a wealth of intelligent observations.
The fantasies themselves, that is, take shape through a causal explanation of their shamefulness; it is their inexpressible nature, evoked only to express their inexpressibility, that, once more, blocks his access to and creates Eric's fantasies themselves.
Part 4 includes a study of Iago's and Cassio's contrasting speech habits, Shakespeare's treatment of etymology, and an exploration of sonnets dealing with the inexpressibility paradox.
Authors writing about war and trauma, for instance, have long struggled productively with the inexpressibility of violent experience, as scholars like Cathy Caruth have noted.
The affects or passions he observes are 'self, metaphor, and inexpressibility', found in (selected) ayres in John Dowland's The First Booke of Songes or Ayres (1597).
Assuming this "logic of inconsistency," the problem of impossibility becomes one of inexpressibility.
Sometimes, the emotion of the writer produces illegibility (an odd twist, during the annus mirabilis of the Second Generation Romantics, of the topos of inexpressibility), as, for example, in the letters which Moncada's brother smuggles into his monastery.
Rather, he sees Nagarjuna as adhering to the traditional doctrine of the inexpressibility of truth and the existence of "an indeterminate truth realm." Harris' intent is to avoid reading Nagarjuna as a nihilist.
The cannon blast wakes the dreamer, who spends the final stanzas reflecting on the dream's inexpressibility.
The ending of Charles Harpur's "The Creek of the Four Graves," a blank verse poem of some 410 lines recounting the murder of four settlers by natives in a remote bush setting, is akin to the passage just quoted from The Prelude; it dwells simply on the final image of the grass-covered mounds as if narrative and descriptive modes have been non-plussed by the inexpressibility of what is left.
Moreover, this inexpressibility is manifested by the juxtaposition of Iona's loneliness and pathos against the absurdity of the stick-like gingerbread horse who seems in deep thought.