inextricable

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in·ex·tri·ca·ble

 (ĭn-ĕk′strĭ-kə-bəl, ĭn′ĭk-strĭk′ə-bəl)
adj.
1.
a. So intricate or entangled as to make escape impossible: an inextricable maze; an inextricable web of deceit.
b. Difficult or impossible to disentangle or untie: an inextricable tangle of threads.
c. Too involved or complicated to solve: an inextricable problem.
2. Unavoidable; inescapable: bound together by an inextricable fate.

in·ex′tri·ca·bil′i·ty, in·ex′tri·ca·ble·ness n.
in·ex′tri·ca·bly adv.

inextricable

(ˌɪnɛksˈtrɪkəbəl)
adj
1. not able to be escaped from: an inextricable dilemma.
2. not able to be disentangled, etc: an inextricable knot.
3. extremely involved or intricate
ˌinextricaˈbility, ˌinexˈtricableness n
ˌinexˈtricably adv

in•ex•tri•ca•ble

(ɪnˈɛk strɪ kə bəl, ˌɪn ɪkˈstrɪk ə-)

adj.
1. from which one cannot extricate oneself: an inextricable maze.
2. incapable of being disentangled, undone, or loosed: an inextricable knot.
3. hopelessly intricate, involved: an inextricable plot.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin]
in•ex`tri•ca•bil′i•ty, n.
in•ex′tri•ca•bly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.inextricable - not permitting extrication; incapable of being disentangled or untied; "an inextricable knot"; "inextricable unity"
extricable - capable of being extricated
Translations

inextricable

[ˌɪnɪksˈtrɪkəbl] ADJinextricable, inseparable

inextricable

[ˌɪnɪkˈstrɪkəbəl] adj [link] → inextricable

inextricable

adj tangleunentwirrbar; confusionunüberschaubar; link, relationshipuntrennbar

inextricable

[ˌɪnɪksˈtrɪkəbl] adjinestricabile
References in periodicals archive ?
And so I return again to the theme of the interpenetration and inextricability in Jewish studies of affective identification and disciplinary labor.
His creative works enable a genuine engagement with interpersonal relationships and values such as love and empathy, which show solipsism as nonsense, the inextricability of the self among selves.
This is the pivotal inextricability of narrativized affect that the suburban ensemble film relies upon: beneath the happy-sad binary, there is another more nuanced emotional palette that always rewards closer attention.
Bataille understands his attempted shift to the perspective of general economy, to the problem and promise of expenditure, as a "Copernican transformation...of ethics." (52) Similarly, Edelman claims that queerness' role in exposing the structural antagonism in the subject's formation and the social order's constitution is an ethical task; according to Edelman, queerness "attains its ethical value precisely insofar as it accedes to [the place of the social order's death drive], accepting its figural status as resistance to the viability of the social while insisting on the inextricability of such resistance from every social structure." (53)
In this regard, we take the inextricability of racial, gendered, sexual, and class power relations as the entry point to interrogate how the current "refugee crisis" is constructed and contested.
Voutas uses this engagement to illuminate the inextricability of culture, how cultural artefacts become embedded in our selves.
I once heard this said about the inextricability of art and poverty, I've never forgotten the words: It is our souls that make us artists, and therefore, it is our souls that make us poor.
For Theseus, as for the broader scientia de anima tradition, what holds pathological apprehension back from its normal progress towards "cool reason" is its inextricability from impassioned imagination, which remains caught in the self-reflexive consumption of its own products.
Changeling's overall thematic concern with the inextricability of
Roy is careful to articulate the inextricability of individual psychology and systemic racism, pointing out that the settler colonial nation is rigged to ensure Indigenous failure:
Memorial representations of space rekindle the retinal images, embracing man's reconciliation with nature, and what is more, his unification with it, as a supreme cradle of existence, where the inextricability of death does not impede the evolution of life, but it even stimulates it:
The local, national and global are often inextricable and to favour one over the other is to miss that inextricability, which can be seen as much through literature as though philosophy and history.