infallibilism


Also found in: Wikipedia.

infallibilism

(ɪnˈfælɪbəˌlɪzəm)
n
(Roman Catholic Church) RC Church the principle of papal infallibility
inˈfallibilist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

infallibilism

1. the belief in or adherence to the dogma of papal infallibility.
2. the dogma itself.
See also: Catholicism
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Revered and Reviled is very effective in helping the reader understand that the ideological caricatures made of Vatican I--as the council that ushered in an extreme view of the infallible papacy or, on the opposite side, as a failed council in need of a formal correction--are wrong because they are ignorant of the history of the council, particularly of the various shades of "infallibilism" in 19th-century Catholicism and at Vatican I.
Intentionally or not, White veers toward a thesis of in-principle infallibilism for human knowers.
Individual writings exploring her Objectivist perspective on fundamental understanding and concepts include "Rand on Concepts, Definitions, and the Advance of Science: Comments on Gotthelf and Lennox", "Keeping Up Appearances: Reflections on the Debate over Perceptual Infallibilism", "Ayn Rand's Theory of Concepts: Rethinking Abstraction", and much more.
The term he uses most often for their hermeneutic is "infallibilism" (50).
This paper argues for a doctrine it calls "infallibilism," which is stipulated to mean that If S knows that p, then the epistemic probability of p for S is 1.
In Chapters 3-5, Cooke explores areas of Peirce's thought that might seem to assume infallibilism: mathematics, the (in)famous theory-practice distinction, critical commonsensism, and synechistic metaphysics.
Cameron, Biblical Higher Criticism and the Defense of Infallibilism in Nineteenth-century Britain (Lewiston, N.Y.: Edwin Mellen, 1987), 106-11.
Trojcak agrees with Cornwell that Pope John Paul suffers from "creeping infallibilism," as well as "papal impeccability," both factors which help "mystify the papal office".
McCormick, observing the easy mustering of the special assistance of the Holy Spirit to support more and more claims to infallibility (a "creeping infallibilism"), concluded that the assistance of the Holy Spirit is something analogous.
We should be careful not to confuse objectivism with infallibilism, and an objectivist is well advised to be a fallibilist, that is, someone who is well aware that he could be wrong and others right, and who thinks long and hard about whether his actions are justified, rather than just assuming that in every case he is the supreme arbiter of morality.
It is also the core of Isaac Levi's "infallibilism".