infamy


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in·fa·my

 (ĭn′fə-mē)
n. pl. in·fa·mies
1. Very bad reputation; notoriety: achieved infamy as the central figure in the scandal.
2. The condition of being infamous; disgrace: a name that will live in infamy.
3. An evil or criminal act that is publicly known.

[Middle English infamie, dishonor, from Old French, from Latin īnfāmia, from īnfāmis, infamous; see infamous.]

infamy

(ˈɪnfəmɪ)
n, pl -mies
1. the state or condition of being infamous
2. an infamous act or event
[C15: from Latin infāmis of evil repute, from in-1 + fāma fame]

in•fa•my

(ˈɪn fə mi)

n., pl. -mies.
1. extremely bad reputation, public reproach, or strong condemnation as the result of a shameful, criminal, or outrageous act: a time that will live in infamy.
2. infamous character or conduct.
3. an infamous act or circumstance.
4. Law. loss of rights, incurred by conviction of an infamous offense.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Latin infāmia; see infamous, -y3]
syn: See disgrace.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.infamy - a state of extreme dishonor; "a date which will live in infamy"- F.D.Roosevelt; "the name was a by-word of scorn and opprobrium throughout the city"
dishonor, dishonour - a state of shame or disgrace; "he was resigned to a life of dishonor"
fame, renown, celebrity - the state or quality of being widely honored and acclaimed
2.infamy - evil fame or public reputation
ill fame, notoriety - the state of being known for some unfavorable act or quality
discredit, disrepute - the state of being held in low esteem; "your actions will bring discredit to your name"; "because of the scandal the school has fallen into disrepute"
fame - favorable public reputation

infamy

infamy

noun
1. Unfavorable, usually unsavory renown:
Translations
شناعَه، عار، فُقْدان السُّمْعَه
hanba
berygtethednedrighed
becstelenség
smán, vansæmd
kötü şöhretrezalet

infamy

[ˈɪnfəmɪ] Ninfamia f

infamy

[ˈɪnfəmi] ninfamie f

infamy

n
(= notoriousness)Verrufenheit f; (= shamefulness)Niedertracht f, → Gemeinheit f; (of deed, conduct)Niedertracht f, → Infamie f, → Schändlichkeit f (geh)
(= public disgrace)Schande f

infamy

[ˈɪnfəmɪ] ninfamia

infamous

(ˈinfəməs) adjective
1. (of something bad) well-known; notorious.
2. disgraceful.
ˈinfamy noun
References in classic literature ?
I should like to enjoy myself thoroughly, and coquet with all the world, till I am on the verge of being called an old maid; and then, to escape the infamy of that, after having made ten thousand conquests, to break all their hearts save one, by marrying some high-born, rich, indulgent husband, whom, on the other hand, fifty ladies were dying to have.
If I were suspicious,' I replied, 'I should have discovered your infamy long before.
Hester," said he, "I ask not wherefore, nor how thou hast fallen into the pit, or say, rather, thou hast ascended to the pedestal of infamy on which I found thee.
Sporting with her infamy, the lost and desperate creature had embroidered the fatal token in scarlet cloth, with golden thread and the nicest art of needlework; so that the capital A might have been thought to mean Admirable, or anything rather than Adulteress.
With respect to any connection between a man and a woman, or a woman and a man, when either of the parties are betrothed, let it be held in utter detestation [1336a] on any pretext whatsoever; but should any one be guilty of such a thing after the marriage is consummated, let his infamy be as great as his guilt deserves.
He had indeed committed no other than an error in politics, by tempering justice with mercy, and by refusing to gratify the good-natured disposition of the mob,[*] with an object for their compassion to work on in the person of poor Jenny, whom, in order to pity, they desired to have seen sacrificed to ruin and infamy, by a shameful correction in Bridewell.
Let him be the best of men, and let him be thought the worst; then he will have been put to the proof; and we shall see whether he will be affected by the fear of infamy and its consequences.
for I hope the reader need not be told, that I do not in the least intend my own country, in what I say upon this occasion,) a great number of persons concerned were called up; and, upon a very slight examination, discovered such a scene of infamy, that I cannot reflect upon it without some seriousness.
The awful discretion which a court of impeachments must necessarily have, to doom to honor or to infamy the most confidential and the most distinguished characters of the community, forbids the commitment of the trust to a small number of persons.
Let them come and take the money, and he would know then to what depths of infamy it was possible for men to descend.
Of what infamy, on their parts, did his beloved and stainless memory remind them?
Reflect: promise to be silent, and riches, consideration, even honor, shall surround you; threaten to speak, and I will condemn you to infamy.