infant baptism


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infant baptism

n. Christianity
The belief in or the practice of baptizing people during infancy rather than later in life. Also called pedobaptism.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
An occasional burst of fervor in Dissenting pulpits on the subject of infant baptism was the only symptom of a zeal unsuited to sober times when men had done with change.
279-280), one might also hypothesize that the same rite (baptism-confirmation-eucharist) should be used for both infants and adults - as is the practice in the Eastern churches; in any case, infant baptism is still by far the most common practice in the Roman Catholic Church, where the eucharist and confirmation are ordinarily administered later.
The central fourth chapter covering the development of baptism from Augustine to the Carolingians focuses on infant baptism, in which there is a ritualistic trust in the efficacy of the sacrament even before the faith of the recipient, though with a complementary reliance on the cooperation of the community.
Brethren apologists argued against sprinkling, pouring, backward immersion, and infant baptism in an attempt to defend the Brethren mode of trine forward immersion.
Williams, ever the controversialist, even at his advanced age, penned "A Brief Reply" around 1680 as a point-by-point rebuttal to Eliot's case for infant baptism and its role in Eliot's evangelization of Native Americans.
In this her first book, Belcher offers a new and intriguing apologetic for infant baptism. She understands that sacraments are culturally effective in the ways that all religious and secular rituals affect individuals and groups in society, and that they are also "theologically effective in integrating human persons into the life of God" (4).
For example, in his letter to Thomas Miintzer (September 1524), Conrad Grebel sketched a brief historical account of baptism in which he criticized Cyprian, Tertullian, Theophylact, and Augustine for allowing infant baptism. (10) Yet, Grebel claimed, the church had not always practiced infant baptism, "for we learn through Cyprian and Augustine that for many years after the time of the apostles, for six hundred years, believers and unbelievers were baptized together." (11) Grebes reference to "six hundred years" probably refers to the time between Cyprian (d.
The very rationale for infant Baptism is the presumption that the little one will be surrounded by a situation as he/she grows up in which Christ reigns.
Pentecostal materials generally don't have the same understanding of infant baptism as reformed traditions, and are often turned down.
While adult Baptism recognizes something that has already happened--a person has come to believe and is ready to commit to a life of faith infant Baptism initiates.
In the chapter on "The Devil and Protestantism" it is suggested that the Anabaptists' abandonment of infant baptism implied that they did not take seriously the personal Satan and evil spirits that were supposedly exorcised with infant baptism.